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How To Buy Bitcoin

A user-friendly guide on how to buy Bitcoin
Figure out how much bitcoin you need. Go to http://www.coindesk.com/calculato and enter the amount you need in USD. ALWAYS buy $5 more than you need as Bitcoin rates can go up and down though out the day, and partial payments are refunded by our payment system.
Step 1) Create a wallet – Somewhere to put your coins: e.g.. Cash App, Paxful, Robinhood etc. there are so many out there.
The Easiest Wallet: Cash App or Paxful
How to Buy Bitcoin with Cash App
How to Send Bitcoin with Cash App
Step 2) If you created your wallet on your desktop, download the app to your smart phone.
Suggested Places to Buy Bitcoins:a) CashApp – Fast and easy
b) Paxful – Buy bitcoin with paypal, zelle, venmo, gift cards etc
c) Robinhood App
d) LibertyX – buy bitcoin on their app or at any 7-11, CVS, or Rite Aid (usa only)
e) Local Coin (Buy with Interac E-transfer for Canadians)
f) Localbitcoins.com
g) Coinmama – Fast
h) Search Google for a Bitcoin atm in your city (takes cash, gives you Bitcoins – Easiest & Fastest Method. You can now do this in 2 minutes with LibertyX at any 7-11, CVS or Riteaid)
Step 3) Purchase your bitcoins.
Remember, you don’t have to a full bitcoin, you may buy decimal amounts ie 0.05btc / 0.0675btc etc – according to what you need.
Please note all bitcoin ATM’s etc take a % for a transaction fee – always calculate that when purchasing your bitcoins as typically you’ll need to buy 3-5% more than your order purchase price.
Step 4) Proceed to www.idviking.com and place your order!!
Step 5) It is IMPORTANT to buy your bitcoins and send them to your own wallet first, before ordering from us. Sometimes it takes a few hours after you first order your bitcoins, before they arrive in your wallet. (with an ATM this is instant).
Voila! You’re Done!
* One thing to note for Canadians using bitcoin ATM’s, the company that runs Honey Badger or Badger Coin in Canada are known scammers, please do not use them as they have been regularly defrauding people out of money. A quick search of their reviews will also confirm this is. There are many other bitcoin ATM’s out there, do not use them.

How To Use A Bitcoin ATM
submitted by Antonio2000x to PhakeIDs [link] [comments]

ETHE & GBTC (Grayscale) Frequently Asked Questions

It is no doubt Grayscale’s booming popularity as a mainstream investment has caused a lot of community hullabaloo lately. As such, I felt it was worth making a FAQ regarding the topic. I’m looking to update this as needed and of course am open to suggestions / adding any questions.
The goal is simply to have a thread we can link to anyone with questions on Grayscale and its products. Instead of explaining the same thing 3 times a day, shoot those posters over to this thread. My hope is that these questions are answered in a fairly simple and easy to understand manner. I think as the sub grows it will be a nice reference point for newcomers.
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for Grayscale and as such am basing all these answers on information that can be found on their website / reports. (Grayscale’s official FAQ can be found here). I also do NOT have a finance degree, I do NOT have a Series 6 / 7 / 140-whatever, and I do NOT work with investment products for my day job. I have an accounting background and work within the finance world so I have the general ‘business’ knowledge to put it all together, but this is all info determined in my best faith effort as a layman. The point being is this --- it is possible I may explain something wrong or missed the technical terms, and if that occurs I am more than happy to update anything that can be proven incorrect
Everything below will be in reference to ETHE but will apply to GBTC as well. If those two segregate in any way, I will note that accordingly.
What is Grayscale? 
Grayscale is the company that created the ETHE product. Their website is https://grayscale.co/
What is ETHE? 
ETHE is essentially a stock that intends to loosely track the price of ETH. It does so by having each ETHE be backed by a specific amount of ETH that is held on chain. Initially, the newly minted ETHE can only be purchased by institutions and accredited investors directly from Grayscale. Once a year has passed (6 months for GBTC) it can then be listed on the OTCQX Best Market exchange for secondary trading. Once listed on OTCQX, anyone investor can purchase at this point. Additional information on ETHE can be found here.
So ETHE is an ETF? 
No. For technical reasons beyond my personal understandings it is not labeled an ETF. I know it all flows back to the “Securities Act Rule 144”, but due to my limited knowledge on SEC regulations I don’t want to misspeak past that. If anyone is more knowledgeable on the subject I am happy to input their answer here.
How long has ETHE existed? 
ETHE was formed 12/14/2017. GBTC was formed 9/25/2013.
How is ETHE created? 
The trust will issue shares to “Authorized Participants” in groups of 100 shares (called baskets). Authorized Participants are the only persons that may place orders to create these baskets and they do it on behalf of the investor.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 39 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Note – The way their reports word this makes it sound like there is an army of authorizers doing the dirty work, but in reality there is only one Authorized Participant. At this moment the “Genesis” company is the sole Authorized Participant. Genesis is owned by the “Digital Currency Group, Inc.” which is the parent company of Grayscale as well. (And to really go down the rabbit hole it looks like DCG is the parent company of CoinDesk and is “backing 150+ companies across 30 countries, including Coinbase, Ripple, and Chainalysis.”)
Source: Digital Currency Group, Inc. informational section on page 77 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
Source: Barry E. Silbert informational section on page 75 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
How does Grayscale acquire the ETH to collateralize the ETHE product? 
An Investor may acquire ETHE by paying in cash or exchanging ETH already owned.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 40 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Where does Grayscale store their ETH? Does it have a specific wallet address we can follow? 
ETH is stored with Coinbase Custody Trust Company, LLC. I am unaware of any specific address or set of addresses that can be used to verify the ETH is actually there.
As an aside - I would actually love to see if anyone knows more about this as it’s something that’s sort of peaked my interest after being asked about it… I find it doubtful we can find that however.
Source: Part C. Business Information, Item 8, subsection A. on page 16 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Can ETHE be redeemed for ETH? 
No, currently there is no way to give your shares of ETHE back to Grayscale to receive ETH back. The only method of getting back into ETH would be to sell your ETHE to someone else and then use those proceeds to buy ETH yourself.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Why are they not redeeming shares? 
I think the report summarizes it best:
Redemptions of Shares are currently not permitted and the Trust is unable to redeem Shares. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval from the SEC and approval by the Sponsor in its sole discretion, the Trust may in the future operate a redemption program. Because the Trust does not believe that the SEC would, at this time, entertain an application for the waiver of rules needed in order to operate an ongoing redemption program, the Trust currently has no intention of seeking regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the fee structure? 
ETHE has an annual fee of 2.5%. GBTC has an annual fee of 2.0%. Fees are paid by selling the underlying ETH / BTC collateralizing the asset.
Source: ETHE’s informational page on Grayscale’s website - Located Here
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 & 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the ratio of ETH to ETHE? 
At the time of posting (6/19/2020) each ETHE share is backed by .09391605 ETH. Each share of GBTC is backed by .00096038 BTC.
ETHE & GBTC’s specific information page on Grayscale’s website updates the ratio daily – Located Here
For a full historical look at this ratio, it can be found on the Grayscale home page on the upper right side if you go to Tax Documents > 2019 Tax Documents > Grayscale Ethereum Trust 2019 Tax Letter.
Why is the ratio not 1:1? Why is it always decreasing? 
While I cannot say for certain why the initial distribution was not a 1:1 backing, it is more than likely to keep the price down and allow more investors a chance to purchase ETHE / GBTC.
As noted above, fees are paid by selling off the ETH collateralizing ETHE. So this number will always be trending downward as time goes on.
Source: Description of Trust on page 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
I keep hearing about how this is locked supply… explain? 
As noted above, there is currently no redemption program for converting your ETHE back into ETH. This means that once an ETHE is issued, it will remain in circulation until a redemption program is formed --- something that doesn’t seem to be too urgent for the SEC or Grayscale at the moment. Tiny amounts will naturally be removed due to fees, but the bulk of the asset is in there for good.
Knowing that ETHE cannot be taken back and destroyed at this time, the ETH collateralizing it will not be removed from the wallet for the foreseeable future. While it is not fully locked in the sense of say a totally lost key, it is not coming out any time soon.
Per their annual statement:
The Trust’s ETH will be transferred out of the ETH Account only in the following circumstances: (i) transferred to pay the Sponsor’s Fee or any Additional Trust Expenses, (ii) distributed in connection with the redemption of Baskets (subject to the Trust’s obtaining regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program and the consent of the Sponsor), (iii) sold on an as-needed basis to pay Additional Trust Expenses or (iv) sold on behalf of the Trust in the event the Trust terminates and liquidates its assets or as otherwise required by law or regulation.
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Grayscale now owns a huge chunk of both ETH and BTC’s supply… should we be worried about manipulation, a sell off to crash the market crash, a staking cartel? 
First, it’s important to remember Grayscale is a lot more akin to an exchange then say an investment firm. Grayscale is working on behalf of its investors to create this product for investor control. Grayscale doesn’t ‘control’ the ETH it holds any more then Coinbase ‘controls’ the ETH in its hot wallet. (Note: There are likely some varying levels of control, but specific to this topic Grayscale cannot simply sell [legally, at least] the ETH by their own decision in the same manner Coinbase wouldn't be able to either.)
That said, there shouldn’t be any worry in the short to medium time-frame. As noted above, Grayscale can’t really remove ETH other than for fees or termination of the product. At 2.5% a year, fees are noise in terms of volume. Grayscale seems to be the fastest growing product in the crypto space at the moment and termination of the product seems unlikely.
IF redemptions were to happen tomorrow, it’s extremely unlikely we would see a mass exodus out of the product to redeem for ETH. And even if there was incentive to get back to ETH, the premium makes it so that it would be much more cost effective to just sell your ETHE on the secondary market and buy ETH yourself. Remember, any redemption is up to the investors and NOT something Grayscale has direct control over.
Yes, but what about [insert criminal act here]… 
Alright, yes. Technically nothing is stopping Grayscale from selling all the ETH / BTC and running off to the Bahamas (Hawaii?). BUT there is no real reason for them to do so. Barry is an extremely public figure and it won’t be easy for him to get away with that. Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust creates SEC reports weekly / bi-weekly and I’m sure given the sentiment towards crypto is being watched carefully. Plus, Grayscale is making tons of consistent revenue and thus has little to no incentive to give that up for a quick buck.
That’s a lot of ‘happy little feels’ Bob, is there even an independent audit or is this Tether 2.0? 
Actually yes, an independent auditor report can be found in their annual reports. It is clearly aimed more towards the financial side and I doubt the auditors are crypto savants, but it is at least one extra set of eyes. Auditors are Friedman LLP – Auditor since 2015.
Source: Independent Auditor Report starting on page 116 (of the PDF itself) of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
As mentioned by user TheCrpytosAndBloods (In Comments Below), a fun fact:
The company’s auditors Friedman LLP were also coincidentally TetheBitfinex’s auditors until They controversially parted ways in 2018 when the Tether controversy was at its height. I am not suggesting for one moment that there is anything shady about DCG - I just find it interesting it’s the same auditor.
“Grayscale sounds kind of lame” / “Not your keys not your crypto!” / “Why is anyone buying this, it sounds like a scam?” 
Welp, for starters this honestly is not really a product aimed at the people likely to be reading this post. To each their own, but do remember just because something provides no value to you doesn’t mean it can’t provide value to someone else. That said some of the advertised benefits are as follows:
So for example, I can set up an IRA at a brokerage account that has $0 trading fees. Then I can trade GBTC and ETHE all day without having to worry about tracking my taxes. All with the relative safety something like E-Trade provides over Binance.
As for how it benefits the everyday ETH holder? I think the supply lock is a positive. I also think this product exposes the Ethereum ecosystem to people who otherwise wouldn’t know about it.
Why is there a premium? Why is ETHE’s premium so insanely high compared to GBTC’s premium? 
There are a handful of theories of why a premium exists at all, some even mentioned in the annual report. The short list is as follows:
Why is ETHE’s so much higher the GBTC’s? Again, a few thoughts:

Are there any other differences between ETHE and GBTC? 
I touched on a few of the smaller differences, but one of the more interesting changes is GBTC is now a “SEC reporting company” as of January 2020. Which again goes beyond my scope of knowledge so I won’t comment on it too much… but the net result is GBTC is now putting out weekly / bi-weekly 8-K’s and annual 10-K’s. This means you can track GBTC that much easier at the moment as well as there is an extra layer of validity to the product IMO.
I’m looking for some statistics on ETHE… such as who is buying, how much is bought, etc? 
There is a great Q1 2020 report I recommend you give a read that has a lot of cool graphs and data on the product. It’s a little GBTC centric, but there is some ETHE data as well. It can be found here hidden within the 8-K filings.Q1 2020 is the 4/16/2020 8-K filing.
For those more into a GAAP style report see the 2019 annual 10-K of the same location.
Is Grayscale only just for BTC and ETH? 
No, there are other products as well. In terms of a secondary market product, ETCG is the Ethereum Classic version of ETHE. Fun Fact – ETCG was actually put out to the secondary market first. It also has a 3% fee tied to it where 1% of it goes to some type of ETC development fund.
In terms of institutional and accredited investors, there are a few ‘fan favorites’ such as Bitcoin Cash, Litcoin, Stellar, XRP, and Zcash. Something called Horizion (Backed by ZEN I guess? Idk to be honest what that is…). And a diversified Mutual Fund type fund that has a little bit of all of those. None of these products are available on the secondary market.
Are there alternatives to Grayscale? 
I know they exist, but I don’t follow them. I’ll leave this as a “to be edited” section and will add as others comment on what they know.
Per user Over-analyser (in comments below):
Coinshares (Formerly XBT provider) are the only similar product I know of. BTC, ETH, XRP and LTC as Exchange Traded Notes (ETN).
It looks like they are fully backed with the underlying crypto (no premium).
https://coinshares.com/etps/xbt-provideinvestor-resources/daily-hedging-position
Denominated in SEK and EUR. Certainly available in some UK pensions (SIPP).
As asked by pegcity - Okay so I was under the impression you can just give them your own ETH and get ETHE, but do you get 11 ETHE per ETH or do you get the market value of ETH in USD worth of ETHE? 
I have always understood that the ETHE issued directly through Grayscale is issued without the premium. As in, if I were to trade 1 ETH for ETHE I would get 11, not say only 2 or 3 because the secondary market premium is so high. And if I were paying cash only I would be paying the price to buy 1 ETH to get my 11 ETHE. Per page 39 of their annual statement, it reads as follows:
The Trust will issue Shares to Authorized Participants from time to time, but only in one or more Baskets (with a Basket being a block of 100 Shares). The Trust will not issue fractions of a Basket. The creation (and, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redemption) of Baskets will be made only in exchange for the delivery to the Trust, or the distribution by the Trust, of the number of whole and fractional ETH represented by each Basket being created (or, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redeemed), which is determined by dividing (x) the number of ETH owned by the Trust at 4:00 p.m., New York time, on the trade date of a creation or redemption order, after deducting the number of ETH representing the U.S. dollar value of accrued but unpaid fees and expenses of the Trust (converted using the ETH Index Price at such time, and carried to the eighth decimal place), by (y) the number of Shares outstanding at such time (with the quotient so obtained calculated to one one-hundred-millionth of one ETH (i.e., carried to the eighth decimal place)), and multiplying such quotient by 100 (the “Basket ETH Amount”). All questions as to the calculation of the Basket ETH Amount will be conclusively determined by the Sponsor and will be final and binding on all persons interested in the Trust. The Basket ETH Amount multiplied by the number of Baskets being created or redeemed is the “Total Basket ETH Amount.” The number of ETH represented by a Share will gradually decrease over time as the Trust’s ETH are used to pay the Trust’s expenses. Each Share represented approximately 0.0950 ETH and 0.0974 ETH as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

submitted by Bob-Rossi to ethfinance [link] [comments]

How To End The Cryptocurrency Exchange "Wild West" Without Crippling Innovation


In case you haven't noticed the consultation paper, staff notice, and report on Quadriga, regulators are now clamping down on Canadian cryptocurrency exchanges. The OSC and other regulatory bodies are still interested in industry feedback. They have not put forward any official regulation yet. Below are some ideas/insights and a proposed framework.



Many of you have limited time to read the full proposal, so here are the highlights:

Offline Multi-Signature

Effective standards to prevent both internal and external theft. Exchange operators are trained and certified, and have a legal responsibility to users.

Regular Transparent Audits

Provides visibility to Canadians that their funds are fully backed on the exchange, while protecting privacy and sensitive platform information.

Insurance Requirements

Establishment of basic insurance standards/strategy, to expand over time. Removing risk to exchange users of any hot wallet theft.


Background and Justifications


Cold Storage Custody/Management
After reviewing close to 100 cases, all thefts tend to break down into more or less the same set of problems:
• Funds stored online or in a smart contract,
• Access controlled by one person or one system,
• 51% attacks (rare),
• Funds sent to the wrong address (also rare), or
• Some combination of the above.
For the first two cases, practical solutions exist and are widely implemented on exchanges already. Offline multi-signature solutions are already industry standard. No cases studied found an external theft or exit scam involving an offline multi-signature wallet implementation. Security can be further improved through minimum numbers of signatories, background checks, providing autonomy and legal protections to each signatory, establishing best practices, and a training/certification program.
The last two transaction risks occur more rarely, and have never resulted in a loss affecting the actual users of the exchange. In all cases to date where operators made the mistake, they've been fully covered by the exchange platforms.
• 51% attacks generally only occur on blockchains with less security. The most prominent cases have been Bitcoin Gold and Ethereum Classic. The simple solution is to enforce deposit limits and block delays such that a 51% attack is not cost-effective.
• The risk of transactions to incorrect addresses can be eliminated by a simple test transaction policy on large transactions. By sending a small amount of funds prior to any large withdrawals/transfers as a standard practice, the accuracy of the wallet address can be validated.
The proposal covers all loss cases and goes beyond, while avoiding significant additional costs, risks, and limitations which may be associated with other frameworks like SOC II.

On The Subject of Third Party Custodians
Many Canadian platforms are currently experimenting with third party custody. From the standpoint of the exchange operator, they can liberate themselves from some responsibility of custody, passing that off to someone else. For regulators, it puts crypto in similar categorization to oil, gold, and other commodities, with some common standards. Platform users would likely feel greater confidence if the custodian was a brand they recognized. If the custodian was knowledgeable and had a decent team that employed multi-sig, they could keep assets safe from internal theft. With the right protections in place, this could be a great solution for many exchanges, particularly those that lack the relevant experience or human resources for their own custody systems.
However, this system is vulnerable to anyone able to impersonate the exchange operators. You may have a situation where different employees who don't know each other that well are interacting between different companies (both the custodian and all their customers which presumably isn't just one exchange). A case study of what can go wrong in this type of environment might be Bitpay, where the CEO was tricked out of 5000 bitcoins over 3 separate payments by a series of emails sent legitimately from a breached computer of another company CEO. It's also still vulnerable to the platform being compromised, as in the really large $70M Bitfinex hack, where the third party Bitgo held one key in a multi-sig wallet. The hacker simply authorized the withdrawal using the same credentials as Bitfinex (requesting Bitgo to sign multiple withdrawal transactions). This succeeded even with the use of multi-sig and two heavily security-focused companies, due to the lack of human oversight (basically, hot wallet). Of course, you can learn from these cases and improve the security, but so can hackers improve their deception and at the end of the day, both of these would have been stopped by the much simpler solution of a qualified team who knew each other and employed multi-sig with properly protected keys. It's pretty hard to beat a human being who knows the business and the typical customer behaviour (or even knows their customers personally) at spotting fraud, and the proposed multi-sig means any hacker has to get through the scrutiny of 3 (or more) separate people, all of whom would have proper training including historical case studies.
There are strong arguments both for and against using use of third party custodians. The proposal sets mandatory minimum custody standards would apply regardless if the cold wallet signatories are exchange operators, independent custodians, or a mix of both.

On The Subject Of Insurance
ShakePay has taken the first steps into this new realm (congratulations). There is no question that crypto users could be better protected by the right insurance policies, and it certainly feels better to transact with insured platforms. The steps required to obtain insurance generally place attention in valuable security areas, and in this case included a review from CipherTrace. One of the key solutions in traditional finance comes from insurance from entities such as the CDIC.
However, historically, there wasn't found any actual insurance payout to any cryptocurrency exchange, and there are notable cases where insurance has not paid. With Bitpay, for example, the insurance agent refused because the issue happened to the third party CEO's computer instead of anything to do with Bitpay itself. With the Youbit exchange in South Korea, their insurance claim was denied, and the exchange ultimately ended up instead going bankrupt with all user's funds lost. To quote Matt Johnson in the original Lloyd's article: “You can create an insurance policy that protects no one – you know there are so many caveats to the policy that it’s not super protective.”
ShakePay's insurance was only reported to cover their cold storage, and “physical theft of the media where the private keys are held”. Physical theft has never, in the history of cryptocurrency exchange cases reviewed, been reported as the cause of loss. From the limited information of the article, ShakePay made it clear their funds are in the hands of a single US custodian, and at least part of their security strategy is to "decline[] to confirm the custodian’s name on the record". While this prevents scrutiny of the custodian, it's pretty silly to speculate that a reasonably competent hacking group couldn't determine who the custodian is. A far more common infiltration strategy historically would be social engineering, which has succeeded repeatedly. A hacker could trick their way into ShakePay's systems and request a fraudulent withdrawal, impersonate ShakePay and request the custodian to move funds, or socially engineer their way into the custodian to initiate the withdrawal of multiple accounts (a payout much larger than ShakePay) exploiting the standard procedures (for example, fraudulently initiating or override the wallet addresses of a real transfer). In each case, nothing was physically stolen and the loss is therefore not covered by insurance.
In order for any insurance to be effective, clear policies have to be established about what needs to be covered. Anything short of that gives Canadians false confidence that they are protected when they aren't in any meaningful way. At this time, the third party insurance market does not appear to provide adequate options or coverage, and effort is necessary to standardize custody standards, which is a likely first step in ultimately setting up an insurance framework.
A better solution compared to third party insurance providers might be for Canadian exchange operators to create their own collective insurance fund, or a specific federal organization similar to the CDIC. Such an organization would have a greater interest or obligation in paying out actual cases, and that would be it's purpose rather than maximizing it's own profit. This would be similar to the SAFU which Binance has launched, except it would cover multiple exchanges. There is little question whether the SAFU would pay out given a breach of Binance, and a similar argument could be made for a insurance fund managed by a collective of exchange operators or a government organization. While a third party insurance provider has the strong market incentive to provide the absolute minimum coverage and no market incentive to payout, an entity managed by exchange operators would have incentive to protect the reputation of exchange operators/the industry, and the government should have the interest of protecting Canadians.

On The Subject of Fractional Reserve
There is a long history of fractional reserve failures, from the first banks in ancient times, through the great depression (where hundreds of fractional reserve banks failed), right through to the 2008 banking collapse referenced in the first bitcoin block. The fractional reserve system allows banks to multiply the money supply far beyond the actual cash (or other assets) in existence, backed only by a system of debt obligations of others. Safely supporting a fractional reserve system is a topic of far greater complexity than can be addressed by a simple policy, and when it comes to cryptocurrency, there is presently no entity reasonably able to bail anyone out in the event of failure. Therefore, this framework is addressed around entities that aim to maintain 100% backing of funds.
There may be some firms that desire but have failed to maintain 100% backing. In this case, there are multiple solutions, including outside investment, merging with other exchanges, or enforcing a gradual restoration plan. All of these solutions are typically far better than shutting down the exchange, and there are multiple cases where they've been used successfully in the past.

Proof of Reserves/Transparency/Accountability
Canadians need to have visibility into the backing on an ongoing basis.
The best solution for crypto-assets is a Proof of Reserve. Such ideas go back all the way to 2013, before even Mt. Gox. However, no Canadian exchange has yet implemented such a system, and only a few international exchanges (CoinFloor in the UK being an example) have. Many firms like Kraken, BitBuy, and now ShakePay use the Proof of Reserve term to refer to lesser proofs which do not actually cryptographically prove the full backing of all user assets on the blockchain. In order for a Proof of Reserve to be effective, it must actually be a complete proof, and it needs to be understood by the public that is expected to use it. Many firms have expressed reservations about the level of transparency required in a complete Proof of Reserve (for example Kraken here). While a complete Proof of Reserves should be encouraged, and there are some solutions in the works (ie TxQuick), this is unlikely to be suitable universally for all exchange operators and users.
Given the limitations, and that firms also manage fiat assets, a more traditional audit process makes more sense. Some Canadian exchanges (CoinSquare, CoinBerry) have already subjected themselves to annual audits. However, these results are not presently shared publicly, and there is no guarantee over the process including all user assets or the integrity and independence of the auditor. The auditor has been typically not known, and in some cases, the identity of the auditor is protected by a NDA. Only in one case (BitBuy) was an actual report generated and publicly shared. There has been no attempt made to validate that user accounts provided during these audits have been complete or accurate. A fraudulent fractional exchange, or one which had suffered a breach they were unwilling to publicly accept (see CoinBene), could easily maintain a second set of books for auditors or simply exclude key accounts to pass an individual audit.
The proposed solution would see a reporting standard which includes at a minimum - percentage of backing for each asset relative to account balances and the nature of how those assets are stored, with ownership proven by the auditor. The auditor would also publicly provide a "hash list", which they independently generate from the accounts provided by the exchange. Every exchange user can then check their information against this public "hash list". A hash is a one-way form of encryption, which fully protects the private information, yet allows anyone who knows that information already to validate that it was included. Less experienced users can take advantage of public tools to calculate the hash from their information (provided by the exchange), and thus have certainty that the auditor received their full balance information. Easy instructions can be provided.
Auditors should be impartial, their identities and process public, and they should be rotated so that the same auditor is never used twice in a row. Balancing the cost of auditing against the needs for regular updates, a 6 month cycle likely makes the most sense.

Hot Wallet Management
The best solution for hot wallets is not to use them. CoinBerry reportedly uses multi-sig on all withdrawals, and Bitmex is an international example known for their structure devoid of hot wallets.
However, many platforms and customers desire fast withdrawal processes, and human validation has a cost of time and delay in this process.
A model of self-insurance or separate funds for hot wallets may be used in these cases. Under this model, a platform still has 100% of their client balance in cold storage and holds additional funds in hot wallets for quick withdrawal. Thus, the risk of those hot wallets is 100% on exchange operators and not affecting the exchange users. Since most platforms typically only have 1%-5% in hot wallets at any given time, it shouldn't be unreasonable to build/maintain these additional reserves over time using exchange fees or additional investment. Larger withdrawals would still be handled at regular intervals from the cold storage.
Hot wallet risks have historically posed a large risk and there is no established standard to guarantee secure hot wallets. When the government of South Korea dispatched security inspections to multiple exchanges, the results were still that 3 of them got hacked after the inspections. If standards develop such that an organization in the market is willing to insure the hot wallets, this could provide an acceptable alternative. Another option may be for multiple exchange operators to pool funds aside for a hot wallet insurance fund. Comprehensive coverage standards must be established and maintained for all hot wallet balances to make sure Canadians are adequately protected.

Current Draft Proposal

(1) Proper multi-signature cold wallet storage.
(a) Each private key is the personal and legal responsibility of one person - the “signatory”. Signatories have special rights and responsibilities to protect user assets. Signatories are trained and certified through a course covering (1) past hacking and fraud cases, (2) proper and secure key generation, and (3) proper safekeeping of private keys. All private keys must be generated and stored 100% offline by the signatory. If even one private keys is ever breached or suspected to be breached, the wallet must be regenerated and all funds relocated to a new wallet.
(b) All signatories must be separate background-checked individuals free of past criminal conviction. Canadians should have a right to know who holds their funds. All signing of transactions must take place with all signatories on Canadian soil or on the soil of a country with a solid legal system which agrees to uphold and support these rules (from an established white-list of countries which expands over time).
(c) 3-5 independent signatures are required for any withdrawal. There must be 1-3 spare signatories, and a maximum of 7 total signatories. The following are all valid combinations: 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.
(d) A security audit should be conducted to validate the cold wallet is set up correctly and provide any additional pertinent information. The primary purpose is to ensure that all signatories are acting independently and using best practices for private key storage. A report summarizing all steps taken and who did the audit will be made public. Canadians must be able to validate the right measures are in place to protect their funds.
(e) There is a simple approval process if signatories wish to visit any country outside Canada, with a potential whitelist of exempt countries. At most 2 signatories can be outside of aligned jurisdiction at any given time. All exchanges would be required to keep a compliant cold wallet for Canadian funds and have a Canadian office if they wish to serve Canadian customers.
(2) Regular and transparent solvency audits.
(a) An audit must be conducted at founding, after 3 months of operation, and at least once every 6 months to compare customer balances against all stored cryptocurrency and fiat balances. The auditor must be known, independent, and never the same twice in a row.
(b) An audit report will be published featuring the steps conducted in a readable format. This should be made available to all Canadians on the exchange website and on a government website. The report must include what percentage of each customer asset is backed on the exchange, and how those funds are stored.
(c) The auditor will independently produce a hash of each customer's identifying information and balance as they perform the audit. This will be made publicly available on the exchange and government website, along with simplified instructions that each customer can use to verify that their balance was included in the audit process.
(d) The audit needs to include a proof of ownership for any cryptocurrency wallets included. A satoshi test (spending a small amount) or partially signed transaction both qualify.
(e) Any platform without 100% reserves should be assessed on a regular basis by a government or industry watchdog. This entity should work to prevent any further drop, support any private investor to come in, or facilitate a merger so that 100% backing can be obtained as soon as possible.
(3) Protections for hot wallets and transactions.
(a) A standardized list of approved coins and procedures will be established to constitute valid cold storage wallets. Where a multi-sig process is not natively available, efforts will be undertaken to establish a suitable and stable smart contract standard. This list will be expanded and improved over time. Coins and procedures not on the list are considered hot wallets.
(b) Hot wallets can be backed by additional funds in cold storage or an acceptable third-party insurance provider with a comprehensive coverage policy.
(c) Exchanges are required to cover the full balance of all user funds as denominated in the same currency, or double the balance as denominated in bitcoin or CAD using an established trading rate. If the balance is ever insufficient due to market movements, the firm must rectify this within 24 hours by moving assets to cold storage or increasing insurance coverage.
(d) Any large transactions (above a set threshold) from cold storage to any new wallet addresses (not previously transacted with) must be tested with a smaller transaction first. Deposits of cryptocurrency must be limited to prevent economic 51% attacks. Any issues are to be covered by the exchange.
(e) Exchange platforms must provide suitable authentication for users, including making available approved forms of two-factor authentication. SMS-based authentication is not to be supported. Withdrawals must be blocked for 48 hours in the event of any account password change. Disputes on the negligence of exchanges should be governed by case law.

Steps Forward

Continued review of existing OSC feedback is still underway. More feedback and opinions on the framework and ideas as presented here are extremely valuable. The above is a draft and not finalized.
The process of further developing and bringing a suitable framework to protect Canadians will require the support of exchange operators, legal experts, and many others in the community. The costs of not doing such are tremendous. A large and convoluted framework, one based on flawed ideas or implementation, or one which fails to properly safeguard Canadians is not just extremely expensive and risky for all Canadians, severely limiting to the credibility and reputation of the industry, but an existential risk to many exchanges.
The responsibility falls to all of us to provide our insight and make our opinions heard on this critical matter. Please take the time to give your thoughts.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Buyer wants to purchase my small eCommerce business with Bitcoin?

Hey everyone, so I've been wanting to sell my small eCommerce Shopify business for a while now, and I have someone that's ready to buy - thing is, they're using crypto247exchange and are suggesting we make the trade using Bitcoin. We would use something like https://www.coindesk.com/calculator to figure out the fair-value exchange of the Bitcoin to match the value of the price/deal.
They're willing to pay the full value of the business, and they want to use the Escrow service in Crpyto247exchange.com to make the trade (that way I could get half the money, wait for it to deposit in my bank account, and then give him the store data - and then receive the other half). I've never traded Bitcoin before with someone - I've only really bought it to invest. I'm a little hesitant but if the escrow works and he's true to his word, then this seems like a plausible deal.
I figured I'd ask the experts - what do you all think?
UPDATE: Really appreciate the replies everyone - going to stay away from this one unless they agree to a private wallet + lawyer deal. Thank you!
submitted by sir_cigar to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Staking in Ethereum 2.0: when will it appear and how much can you earn on it?

Staking in Ethereum 2.0: when will it appear and how much can you earn on it?

Staking in Ethereum 2.0: when will it appear and how much can you earn on it?

Why coin staking will be added in Ethereum 2.0

A brief educational program for those who do not follow the update of the project of Vitalik Buterin. Ethereum has long been in need of updating, and the main problem of the network is scalability: the blockchain is overloaded, transactions are slowing down, and the cost of “gas” (transaction fees) is growing. If you do not update the consensus algorithm, then the network will someday cease to be operational. To avoid this, developers have been working for several years on moving the network from the PoW algorithm to state 2.0, running on PoS. This should make the network more scalable, faster and cheaper. In December last year, the first upgrade phase, Istanbul, was implemented in the network, and in April of this year, the Topaz test network with the possibility of staking was launched - the first users already earned 1%. In the PoS algorithm that Ethereum switches to, there is no mining, and validation occurs due to the delegation of user network coins to the masternodes. For the duration of the delegation, these coins are frozen, and for providing their funds for block validation, users receive a portion of the reward. This is staking - such a crypto-analogue of a bank deposit. There are several types of staking: with income from dividends or masternodes, but not the device’s power, as in PoW algorithms, but the number of miner coins is important in all of them. The more coins, the higher the income. For crypto investors, staking is an opportunity to receive passive income from blocked coins. It is assumed that the launch of staking:
  • Will make ETH mining more affordable, but less resource intensive;
  • Will make the network more secure and secure - attacks will become too expensive;
  • Will create an entirely new sector of steak infrastructure around the platform;
  • Provides increased scalability, which will create the opportunity for wider implementation of DeFi protocols;
  • And, most importantly, it will show that Ethereum is a developing project.

The first payments to stakeholders will be one to two years after the launch of the update

The minimum validator steak will be 32 ETN (≈$6092 for today). This is the minimum number of coins that an ETH holder must freeze in order to qualify for payments. Another prerequisite is not to disconnect your wallet from the network. If the user disconnects and goes into automatic mode, he loses his daily income. If at some point the steak drops below 16 ETH, the user will be deprived of the right to be a validator. The Ethereum network has to go through many more important stages before coin holders can make money on its storage. Collin Myers, the leader of the product strategy at the startup of the Ethereum developer ConsenSys, said that the genesis block of the new network will not be mined until the total amount of frozen funds reaches 524,000 ETN ($99.76 million at the time of publication). So many coins should be kept by 16,375 validators with a minimum deposit of 32 ETN. Until this moment, none of them will receive a percentage profit. Myers noted that this event is not tied to a clear time and depends on the activity of the community. All validators will have to freeze a rather significant amount for an indefinite period in the new network without confidence in the growth of the coin rate. It’s hard to say how many people there are. The developers believe that it will take 12−18 or even 24 months. According to the latest ConsenSys Codefi report, more than 65% of the 300 ETH owners surveyed plan to use the staking opportunity. This sample, of course, is not representative, but it can be assumed that most major coin holders will still be willing to take a chance.

How much can you earn on Ethereum staking

Developers have been arguing for a long time about what profitability should be among the validators of the Ethereum 2.0 network. The economic model of the network maintains an inflation rate below 1% and dynamically adjusts the reward scale for validators. The difficulty is not to overpay, but not to pay too little. Profitability will be variable, as it depends on the number and size of steaks, as well as other parameters. The fewer frozen coins and validators, the higher the yield, and vice versa. This is an easy way to motivate users to freeze ETN. According to the October calculations of Collin Myers, after the launch of Ethereum 2.0, validators will be able to receive from 4.6% to 10.3% per annum as a reward for their steak. At the summit, he clarified that the first time after the launch of the Genesis block, it can even reach 20.3%. But as the number of steaks grows, profitability will decline. So, with five million steaks, it drops to about 6.6%. The above numbers are not net returns. They do not include equipment and electricity costs. According to Myers, after the Genesis block, the costs of maintaining the validator node will be about 4.75% of the remuneration. They will continue to increase as the number of blocked coins increases, and with a five millionth steak, they will grow to about 14.7%. Myers emphasized that profitability will be higher for those who will work on their own equipment, rather than relying on cloud services. The latter, according to his calculations, at current prices can bring a loss of up to minus 15% per year. This, he believes, promotes true decentralization. At the end of April, Vitalik Buterin said that validators will be able to earn 5% per annum with a minimum stake of 32 ETH - 1.6 ETH per year, or $ 304 at the time of publication. However, given the cost of freezing funds, the real return will be at 0.8%.

How to calculate profitability from ETN staking

The easiest way to calculate the estimated return for Ethereum staking is to use a special calculator. For example, from the online services EthereumPrice or Stakingrewards. The service takes into account the latest indicators of network profitability, as well as additional characteristics: the time of operation of a node in the network, the price of a coin, the share of blocked ETNs and so on. Depending on these values, the profit of the validator can vary greatly. For example, you block 32 ETNs at today's coin price - $190, 1% of the coins are blocked, and the node works 99% of the time. According to the EthereumPrice calculator, in this case your yield will be 14.25% per annum, or 4.56 ETH.
Validator earnings from the example above for 10 years according to EthereumPrice.
If to change the data, you have the same steak, but the proportion of blocked coins is 10%. Now your annual yield is only 4.51%, or 1.44 ETH.
Validator earnings from the second example over 10 years according to EthereumPrice.
It is important that this is profitability excluding expenses. Real returns will be significantly lower and in the second case may be negative. In addition, you must consider the fluctuation of the course. Even with a yield of 14% per annum in ETN, dollar-denominated returns may be negative in a bear market.

When will the transition to Ethereum 2.0 start

Ben Edgington from Teku, the operator of Ethereum 2.0, at the last summit said that the transition to PoS could be launched in July this year. These deadlines, if there are no new delays, were also mentioned by experts of the BitMEX crypto exchange in their recent report on the transition of the Ethereum ecosystem to stage 2.0. However, on May 12, Vitalik Buterin denied the possibility of launching Ethereum 2.0 in July. The network is not yet ready and is unlikely to be launched before the end of the year. July 30 marks the 5th anniversary of the launch of Ethereum. Unfortunately, it seems that it will not be possible to start the update for the anniversary again. Full deployment of updates will consist of several stages. Phase 0. Beacon chain. The "zero" phase, which can be launched in July this year. In fact, it will only be a network test and PoS testing without economic activity, but it will use new ETN coins and the possibility of staking will appear. The "zero" phase will test the first layer of Ethereum 2.0 architecture - Lighthouse. This is the Ethereum 2.0 client in Rust, developed back in 2018. Phase 1. Sharding - rejection of full nodes in favor of load balancing between all network nodes (shards). This should increase network bandwidth and solve the scalability problem. This is the first full phase of Ethereum 2.0. It will initially be deployed with 64 shards. It is because of sharding that the transition of a network to a new state is so complicated - existing smart contracts cannot be transferred to a new network. Therefore, at first, perhaps several years, both networks will exist simultaneously. Phase 2. State execution. In this phase, various applications will work, and it will be possible to conclude smart contracts. This is a full-fledged working Ethereum 2.0 network. After the second phase, two networks will work in parallel - Ethereum and Ethereum 2.0. Coin holders will be able to transfer ETN from the first to the second without the ability to transfer them back. To stimulate network support, coin emissions in both networks will increase until they merge. Read more about the phases of transition to state 2.0 in the aforementioned BitMEX report.

How the upgrade to Ethereum 2.0 will affect the staking market and coin price

The transition of the second largest coin to PoS will dramatically increase the stake in the market. The deposit in 32 ETH is too large for most users. Therefore, we should expect an increase in offers for staking from the exchanges. So, the launch of such a service in November was announced by the largest Swiss crypto exchange Bitcoin Suisse. She will not have a minimum deposit, and the commission will be 15%. According to October estimates by Binance Research analysts, the transition of Ethereum to stage 2.0 can double the price of a coin and the stake of staking in the market, and it will also make ETH the most popular currency on the PoS algorithm. Adam Cochran, partner at MetaCartel Ventures DAO and developer of DuckDuckGo, argued in his blog that Ethereum's transition to state 2.0 would be the “biggest event” of the cryptocurrency market. He believes that a 3–5% return will attract the capital of large investors, and fear of lost profit (FOMO) among retail investors will push them to actively buy coins. The planned coin burning mechanism for each transaction will reduce the potential oversupply. However, BitMEX experts in the report mentioned above believe that updating the network will not be as important an event as it seems to many, and will not have a significant impact on the coin rate and the staking market. Initially, this will be more likely to test the PoS system, rather than a full-fledged network. There will be no economic activity and smart contracts, and interest for a steak will not be paid immediately. Therefore, most of the economic activity will continue to be concluded in the original Ethereum network, which will work in parallel with the new one. Analysts of the exchange emphasized that due to the addition of staking, the first time (short, in their opinion) a large number of ETNs will be blocked on the network. Most likely, this will limit the supply of coins and lead to higher prices. However, this can also release some of the ETNs blocked in smart contracts, and then the price will not rise. Moreover, the authors of the document are not sure that the demand for coins will be long-term and stable. For this to happen, PoS and sharding must prove that they work stably and provide the benefits for which the update was started. But, if this happens, the network is waiting for a wave of coins from the developers of smart contracts and DeFi protocols. In any case, quick changes should not be expected. A full transition to Ethereum 2.0 will take years and won’t be smooth - network failures are inevitable. We also believe that we should not rely on Ethereum staking as another panacea for all the problems of the coin and the market. Most likely, the transition of the network to PoS will not have a significant impact on the staking market, but may positively affect the price of the coin. However, relying on the ETN rally in anticipation of this is too optimistic.
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submitted by Smart_Smell to Robopay [link] [comments]

First Mover: In the Cryptocurrency Markets, No Two Exchanges Are Alike

First Mover: In the Cryptocurrency Markets, No Two Exchanges Are Alike


In the cryptocurrency markets, no two exchanges are alike. Even in major crypto exchanges, trading U.S. dollars for bitcoin can have fairly different order sizes and spreads, according to data compiled by aggregator CryptoCompare.
Average order sizes over the past week were quite varied, CryptoCompare found. Orders on Bitstamp averaged $3,424.11, the highest of major dollar to bitcoin (USD/BTC) pair exchanges. ItBit was second to Bitstamp at $2,874.17, with Kraken at $2787.68. Gemini’s average was in the middle of the pack at $1,438.31, followed by Coinbase at $1,113.15. Bitfinex was lowest, with an average order totaling $342.09. The average order of the six exchanges was $1,996.58.
You’re reading First Mover, CoinDesk’s daily markets newsletter. Assembled by the CoinDesk Markets Team, First Mover starts your day with the most up-to-date sentiment around crypto markets, which of course never close, putting in context every wild swing in bitcoin and more. We follow the money so you don’t have to. You can subscribe here.
Average spreads between the highest bid offer and the lowest ask offer on an exchange order book also varied significantly. Data from CryptoCompare shows a few exchanges have a much larger daily price spread than others.
“This is derived from L2 order book data, without fee calculations, on top of this,” said Constantine Tsav, head of research for CryptoCompare. Level 2, or L2, order book data is a term for market information that includes the scope of bid and ask prices for a given asset, in this case USD/BTC.
Luxembourg-based Bitstamp, at $5.21 and New York-domiciled Gemini, at $2.38, have the largest average spreads in intraday trading, in this case CryptoCompare used a two-hour interval. Market spread is the gap between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the order book. Thus the gap is the difference between the price traders are willing to sell an asset and others are willing to buy an asset, and vice versa.
submitted by Han121212 to u/Han121212 [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

A thought: bitcoin will spend most of 2019 under 3k.

This post is a bit convoluted so there’s a TLDR at the bottom in bold. For the record, I didn’t base this on any reading or external sources, this is mostly just from my daydreams during the day. So I am definitely not too confident about this and am looking for some critiques.
So I was thinking today about the moving averages and was fascinated with how the 9 day moving average seemed to be acting as resistance on the 4 hour chart. This got me thinking about some questions. What is a moving average precisely? Why does a moving average have the price it has?
Well, the MA is the average of prices at which bitcoin was sold for over the a particular timeframe. OK, but what does that mean? What physical events does a moving average represent?
To help me think about what sort of physical events a moving average represents, I decided to use an analogy. Let’s say we’re not talking about bitcoin, let’s say we are talking about apples. Let’s say there’s a market with lots of rekt bitcoin traders apple sellers and the apple sellers sell their apples at different prices to buyers. The price of the apples goes up and down based on number of buyers and sellers.
Very intuitive so far, but what’s a moving average? Well, a moving average is the average price the apples sold for in the past on the day you were buying the apples. So let’s just say you buy an apple at this market every day. Assuming you didn’t literally calculate the moving average for the price of apples, your monthly moving average is just your general sense of how expensive or cheap the apples were in the month or so. But there’s an important nuance. Most importantly, the moving average is your general sense of the past price of apples without taking into account the overall in price over time. Ie: assuming your memory of the apple price was just the average price without any sense what the prices were in a particular month or season, then you would be remembering the moving average.
So what does this have to do with bitcoin? Well, replace apples with bitcoin and that’s basically what a bitcoin moving average is. It’s the market’s “memory” of the past bitcoin price without any sense of the variation in price over time.
Now, here’s where things get interesting. According to this market memory, what was bitcoin’s price in the past four years? The market’s answer is given by the 200 week moving average, which is 3300. But why does the market think the average price in the past 4 years is 3300? Why is it 3300, as opposed to 6k or 600?
The reason why is because the primary influence on the market’s memory is the giant surge of buyers in 2017, which pushed the price up past what the average previously was. You can see it by looking at how steeply the average rose in 2017.. There’s no way the market would be anywhere close to where it is now without that surge. Because this memory the market has doesn’t include variation, it “thinks”, in a sense, that the typical price in the past 4 years was around 3k (even though it wasn’t even close to that price most of the time) because it is anchored by the surge in buying interest that the market experienced in 2017.
So can we expect the price to stay above the moving average? Well, the fundamental cause (the surge of buyers) that influenced the moving average above 3k are no longer present. Therefore, I think we can expect the price to dip below the 200 week ma, and I think it’s pretty obvious from recent price action that this is where we are going. But the real question now is how long are we going to stay below the 200 week MA? The answer, I think is simple: to get back to the moving average, we would need a ratio of buyers to sellers similar to what the market “remembers” there being in the past 4 years. And since the moving average is at the level it is at due to the surge of buying interest in 2017 we basically need to recreate a ratio of buyers to sellers similar to what there was in early to mid 2017. (And there is a counterargument which I address in comments.)
So when are we likely to have that ratio of buyers to sellers? Essentially, similar to the bet I made in a previous post, by betting the price will go above the moving average in, say 2019 or 2020, you are effectively betting we will have a similar ratio of buyers to sellers to the ratio we had in 2017 at some point in 2019 and 2020.
I think it is likely we will not have that level of interest any time in 2019, and probably not for much of 2020. It thereby follows that we will likely spend quarters 2, 3, and quite possibly 4 in 2019 and quarter 1 of 2020 below the 200 week moving average, meaning that until 2020, the price will not rise above 3k. This also implies a sub 2k bottom, possibly in the low 1ks and possibly a later bubble due to the next halvening (2022 instead of 2021).
TLDR: the main influence behind the 200 week ma is the surge of buyers in 2017. That means that if we dip below it, we will need a similar surge of buyers that we saw in 2017 to get above it. This is unlikely in 2019 and 2020. Therefore we will spend most of that time below the 200 week ma.
submitted by Happy_Pizza_ to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Time to discuss the elephant in the room. Nicehash 51% Attacks.

While I've argued for ProgPoW because I'm not a fan of ASIC manufactures because of their malicious business practices, I think we all know the real problem for PoW security, Hashrate Rental sites. Let's go through a short-list of coins that are listed on Nicehash, where hashpower could be bought and then executed a 51% attack.
Monacoin 51%
BitcoinGold 51%
EthereumClassic 51%
Vertcoin 51%
ZenCash(Now Horizen) 51%
BitcoinPrivate 51% (Ethical Hack)

Nicehash has been the #1 to go to "sell" hashpower for whatever coin they support for BTC and other rental services such as miningrigrental. While we cannot prove that this attacks were used by buying hashpower on nicehash, a ethical hacker Geocold lived streamed how easy it was to attack PoW coin BTCP. "using a couple of hundred dollars’ worth of rented hashpower he’d purchased from Nicehash with BTC" (bitcoin.com). We can assume then that other 51% attacks all follow this method.

Step 1. Buy more Hashpower than the current network using rental services
Step 2. moves coins on the true network to other addresses, makes deposits, then withdraws them to a safe addresses
Step 3. broadcast the untruthful chain to the network
Step 4. this reverts the truthful network.
Step 5. Profit.
Shockingly, several crypto-currencies not only were cheap to attack but also had plenty of hash rate for sale on NiceHash with which such an attack could take place. When 51% attacks were considered in the past, most calculations included the cost of hardware, electricity, and maintenance. But this new “rent-a-attack” method is proving dangerous for smaller networks. (ccn.com)
This is what happened to ETC recently. Few people who were using nicehash services commented that they noticed a pay-bump mining ETH-HASH.

One PoW altcoin team has set up a script to constantly monitor their hashrate. In the event of a spike of over 10%, they will be automatically notified. Should the newly added hashrate emanate from an unknown pool, or be in danger of tipping an existing pool over 50%, they have a large quantity BTC on standby with Nicehash ready to purchase their own firepower to counter the attack (bitcoin.com)
Again it shows the only way that people counter this is to over-bid/buy more hashrate.

While I understand PoS doesn't suffer from these type of attacks. However I find it unreasonable to say PoW is flawed because 51% attacks. Hashrental services we not envisioned by Satoshi's PoW. Any actual mining actors not using hash rentals would need a sizable amount of resources to perform a 51% and double-spend even on small cap coins. Nicehash takes your money and doesn't care.

The elephant Crypto needs to deal with it shutting off nicehash and rental services. After the nicehash hack I know I saw a sizable increase in profits because difficulty dropped on so many coins.

IMHO Nicehash needs to turn-off purchasing hashrate and instead turn to "auto-covert" where they mine the coin that's profitable that day and turn into bitcoin for the user. We wouldn't have the chance of 51% attacks.
submitted by Xazax310 to gpumining [link] [comments]

Useful Beginner's Guide to Syscoin

What is Syscoin?

Some have described Syscoin (SYS) as the Shopify, Amazon and Ebay of the blockchain world. Syscoin is a revolutionary cryptocurrency that offers near zero cost financial transactions, incredible speed and provides businesses the infrastructure to trade goods, assets, digital certificates and data securely. Syscoin isn’t just about money and trading, it has the ability to attract various business types thanks to its native set of features geared towards business on the blockchain. From eBay traders and High Street shops to Medical applications, Insurance and Gaming, Syscoin’s decentralized network benefits everyone!   Syscoin is developed by Blockchain Foundry (BF). BF provides blockchain technology based services, projects and products for a wide variety of use cases with the stated aim of disrupting markets by leveraging the potential of blockchain technology. Syscoin is mainly known to be the first cryptocurrency to offer a fully decentralized marketplace based on blockchain. What is lesser known is that this is only a part of what Syscoin offers.   With the introduction of Masternodes in February or March 2018 SYS will be transformed from just a ’marketplace coin’ to a completely ‘utilitarian coin’. The Masternode infrastructure allows the addition of decentralized databases and file storage, increased transaction speed to surpass POS/Visa/Mastercard capabilities, true Turing complete smart contract capabilities for unlimited business logic, sidechains, application layers and an identity layer. This will all be accessible through an API, rather than a new language, enabling nearly any developer to create any blockchain application they can conceive. This will usher in the next generation of blockchain applications - made for new or existing businesses - by conveniently offering everything available from the blockchain space today. In simple terms think Dash + Ethereum/Lisk + Monero + Nano + Storj + Particl capabilities all in one coin!    

SYS Origin

The blockchain as conceptualized by Satoshi Nakamoto back in 2008 envisioned a peer-to-peer electronic cash network that would prevent double-spending. A year later, the blockchain became an integral part of bitcoin, serving as the latter's public ledger of transactions. Although Nakamoto's reference client mentioned a decentralized marketplace service, the subsequent implementation did not incorporate this due to a lack of resources.   Syscoin was initially described in a 2014 draft whitepaper that envisioned Decentralized Marketplace Creation, Decentralized Smart Contracts and Documents, Decentralized Certificate Issuance and Transfer, and Decentralized Data Storage and Retrieval, as among the services that it would offer upon its release.   Syscoin aimed to bring Nakamoto's vision of a decentralized marketplace back into the blockchain, among the other commercial-grade services it aims to deliver to clients. Other services that Syscoin plans to provide include secure data storage and transfer, and unique user aliases that link their owners to the services controlled by the alias.   The early Syscoin wallet was superseded by the release of Blockmarket Desktop 1.0 on September 12, 2017, marking the culmination of Syscoin's vision of a fully decentralized marketplace with a desktop GUI based on the blockchain.   The planned release of Blockmarket Web, a fully web-based version, and Blockmarket Professional in 2018 takes that vision one step further, as more advanced seller stores become a reality.    

The Team

The Team that NEVER quits! Before the launch of Syscoin (Q3 2014), there was a presale ICO by Moolah (as a partner), which turned out to be detrimental for Syscoin. The project raised around 1,000BTC for development but the Syscoin Team only managed to access 250BTC which were used for price support. Moolah (Ryan Kennedy) absconded with the bulk of the ICO funds and the Syscoin team were left with ~30million Syscoin at a price around 400 satoshi. Even after this tragic event, the devs didn’t quit and continued to work on the project without stopping. The case against Moolah is still on-going. See the article from CoinDesk here: http://www.coindesk.com/uk-court-syscoin-injunction-moolah-750-btc/.   What is this detail telling us about the dev team? While some crypto projects are just scams and bring little to no innovation, they’ve proven that they are in it for the long term - ably demonstrated by the fact that they continued to work despite their funds being stolen. And now that hard work is beginning to pay off with the entire team going full-time for the first time in January 2018 and new developers being hired following VC funding for BF.
View Team Page.    

Blockchain Foundry Products

BF Products    

What is Blockmarket Desktop?

Building on the World's First Decentralized Marketplace, Blockmarket is the newest generation of Syscoin's Desktop wallet with a complete, state-of-the-art marketplace built-in where you can securely and reliably buy and sell any items you wish. Entire stores can be created directly through the marketplace where you can sell your own products or re-sell others’ products for commission. Use of blockchain technology eliminates middlemen, credit card fees, maintenance fees, downtime and political interference. Persons are literally able to buy or sell anything to anyone, anytime, anywhere on Earth! Blockmarket Desktop was launched on September 12, 2017. Download Blockmarket Desktop 1.2    

Key Blockmarket Features

- Decentralized Marketplace

The marketplace platform provides a decentralized and high redundant channel for selling goods and services. Features include: • Price Pegging to currencies such as USD, EUR, GBP, CAD, CNY and BTC • Bitcoin and Zcash as payment options • Arbitrated Escrow • Encrypted Messaging • KYC/AML Compliance • Images • Unlimited Inventory Items  

- Name Aliases

Wallet addresses for cryptocurrencies generally consist of a unique string of between 27-34 alphanumeric characters. Such an address isn’t easy to memorize. Although the addresses can be added to an address book within the wallet, Syscoin has taken the user's convenience one step further, allowing you to create a unique Alias for your wallet address, such as a name, title, or characters specific to a username. These can be used to send SYS from home, to a mobile wallet, to work, to friends, to common suppliers or to repeat customers easily, without requiring any memorizing, writing it down, copy & pasting or emailing yourself the address.  

- Digital Certificates

Using the cryptography of the blockchain persons can issue, authorize, and exchange digital certificates of any kind. With Syscoin anyone can issue provably-unique certificates with text or ASCII content to one or multiple parties on the Syscoin blockchain. These certificates can be authenticated by anyone via Syscoin’s cryptographic proof of work. This allows for the creation and free exchange of any kind of digital asset such as ownership certificates, warranties, receipts, tickets, certifications, diplomas, software licenses and more.  

- Integrated Exchanges

Integrated Crypto exchanges - Flypme and Changelly will facilitate exchanging 30+ cryptos for SYS, directly within the Blockmarket wallet.  

- Security Audit Verified

Blockmarket was successfully and independently security audited by Digital Boundary Group and was deemed low risk. View Audit Results.    

Blockmarket Desktop – Quickstart Tutorials (16 short vids)

BM Desktop – Quickstart Tutorials    

Blockmarket Web – (The Key to Mass Adoption)

BM web will bring SYS’s existing decentralized marketplace and all its features into a web-based version, enabling ease of use with a simple email and password login (grandma friendly) without any need for downloading a wallet or waiting for sync. Blockmarket web will be launched in Q1 2018.   This launch will be accompanied by a marketing campaign roll-out that seeks to build brand recognition with audiences within the existing crypto ecosystem and more significantly with the broader, global, non-crypto audience. For this reason Ballistic Arts, a full-service marketing agency was retained by BF. BF Engages Marketing Agency    

Primary Target Market + Value Potential

The primary target market for BF’s Syscoin/Blockmarket web flagship is the retail e-commerce industry. This sets up their decentralized marketplace to rival such commercial giants as Amazon ($648B market cap), Alibaba ($453B market cap) and eBay ($43B market cap). According to eMarketer’s Worldwide Retail and Ecommerce Sales report, global retail e-commerce sales for 2017 were $2.3 Trillion. This is expected to reach an estimated $4 Trillion by 2020 reflecting the rapid growth within this sector.   To perform a very simple assessment of the Syscoin/Blockmarket web’s potential let’s assume that a 1% portion of the forecasted $4 trillion market is captured, which represents $40 billion in revenue. Assuming a sales to market cap ratio of 1:1 for simplicity, the circulating supply of 531 million SYS, with a $40 billion market cap yields a price of roughly $75 per coin. However, with masternodes that limit the circulating supply and token utility that extends beyond retail e-commerce, the SYS price could likely reach much higher. Please note that these are just very simple assumptions and projections for this exercise, however the real world driven potential that this project has is clearly evident.    

Key Syscoin Developments

- Z-DAG: Zero Confirmation Transactions with Double Spend Protection (WORLD’S FIRST)

View Developer’s Twitter post View Syscoin’s Twitter post  

- Masternodes

Ability for world-class transactions-per-second performance to scale-out with added nodes (theoretically 100k TPS per 1000 Masternodes, 300k TPS/3k masternodes, etc). In later releases, masternodes will also process smart contracts and facilitate sharded+encrypted offchain file-storage (with onchain anchors), among other touted functionality. They should also result in steadying the price movements - less volatility as holding will be incentivized.  

- Masternode Rewards + Min. Hardware Specs

Masternode Rewards + Min. Hardware Specs Masternode ROI Calculator  

- Smart Contracts

Scalable Ethereum Virtual Machine: Allows Turin complete smart contracts to be executed following the ethereum protocol at a much faster speed and at a fraction of the ethereum gas price.  

- Assets & Token Issuance

With its token issuance service, Syscoin allows anyone to create a custom asset token which can then be sent directly to anyone else on the network. This facilitates a variety of use cases including ICO token issuance, supply chain management, reward points, and loyalty programs.  

- Anonymous Transactions

Anonymous transactions: via mixing/shuffling at user-specified denomination. Afterwards, additional tech will be added in the near future which will further compound the degree of anonymity provided -Add ValueShuffle running on top of the masternode layer and you have the world's most advanced privacy tech in any coin. This brings true money fungibility to Syscoin and the missing link for true economic sovereignty. View Developer’s Twitter post.  

- Instant Send

Transactions can be sent and received instantly. This represents a similar sending capability as Dash, but is a step beyond- A type of backend node locking will allow an instantly received sum to be sent immediately, without delay, and without network risk of double-spend.    

Why Invest in Syscoin?

 

Merchants

Merchant Pilot Program    

Partnerships

Development Updates

White Paper

White Paper.pdf Note: It is anticipated that the whitepaper will be updated by the team in the near future due to recent developments    

Roadmap

Roadmap 2017-2018.png    

Blockchain Application Development Architecture

Blockchain Application Development Architecture.png    

Feature List 2017 & 2018

Feature List 2017 & 2018.jpg    

Where to Buy

BittrexPoloniexUpbitTux ExchangeLivecoinYobitAEXBittyliciousChangellyFlyp.me    

Wallets

• Block Market Wallet 1.2 – Windows and Mac. Download from https://syscoin.org/ • QT Wallet for Developers: Download from https://github.com/syscoin/syscoin2/releases/tag/2.1.6Coinomi – Syscoin MultiCoin Wallet (only supports send/receive)HolyTransaction – Syscoin Multicoin Web Wallet (desktop & android)    

Need Help or Want to Contribute?

If you need help for an important wallet issue or if you want to know how you can contribute in promoting Syscoin Join the Slack channel where the SYS team and community members are active, helpful and responsive.    

Credit To

Other Sources

https://syscoin.org/ https://twitter.com/syscoin https://www.blockchainfoundry.co/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syscoin    

Last Updated

This post was last updated on Feb 10 2018.    

Disclaimer

This post was created particularly to aid those who are new to Syscoin. Please note that the content provided within this post is for information purposes only and is not to be construed as investment advice.
submitted by idbrews to SysCoin [link] [comments]

0xBitcoin General - Weeks 45 and 46, 2018

On this day, 19th of November on the year of our Lord 2018, bitcoin dropped under five thousand United States dollars a piece. These are truly dark times that we are living in, so let us take a glance upon the recent 0xBTC developments and try to sustain ourselves on hopium until this wretched bear market comes to an end.

Some general stats (and changes since last time):
Mining difficulty: 796,213,990 (-2.67%) (next: ~718,929,110) (-10.14%)​
Estimated hashrate: 1.17 Th/s (-55.17%)
Current average reward time: 47.37 minutes (+216.49%)
Tokens minted: 3,349,050 0xBTC (+0.65%)
Token holders: 4649 holders (+2.04%)
Total contract operations: 188834 txs (+0.23%)
Source: https://0x1d00ffff.github.io/0xBTC-Stats/?page=stats&#

Tokens required to be a top holder (and changes since last time):
Top 10: 36197.32435793 0xBTC (0.00%)
Top 25: 22697.97400257 0xBTC (+-3.88%)
Top 50: 14174 0xBTC (-1.22%)
Top 100: 7352.5851492 0xBTC (+2.69%)
Top 200: 3000 0xBTC (+0.2%)
Top 300: 1600 0xBTC (+3.22%)
Top 500: 675.17635038 0xBTC (+3.84%)​
Top 1000: 173.3201683 0xBTC (+1.76%)
Source: https://etherscan.io/token/0xb6ed7644c69416d67b522e20bc294a9a9b405b31#balance

Recent events:
  1. Lodge proposed a plan to use the PoW contributed towards mining 0xBTC to secure an offchain bridge. https://medium.com/@jlogelin/arbitrary-off-chain-security-using-0xbitcoin-merged-proof-of-work-7c4ff0d07d3f
  2. 0xBitcoin was listed on Rootrex, which is a DEX that's partnered with Bithumb. Acydutz lead the initiative by simply explaining the idea behind the project and sending them a few 0xBTC to play around with. https://medium.com/@oneroot/oxbitcoin-will-get-listed-on-rootrex-at-14-00-utc-8-on-november-13-77930052fc55
  3. 0xBTC was listed on CoinCalculators.io, a site which tracks the benefits of mining various cryptos. https://www.coincalculators.io/coin.aspx?crypto=0xbitcoin-mining-calculator
  4. The sponsored article was published on CryptoCurrencyNews last week. After the community gathered 9 ETH in donations to pay for the fee, MoonBoy3000 did most of the heavy lifting in regards to the writing, with a lot of help from Mr. F. The result of that was an eloquently written article that is sure to win some more people over to our camp. https://www.ccn.com/0xbitcoin-ethereums-answer-to-bitcoins-proof-of-work/
  5. Frogger pulled some strings and got us a 0xBitcoin banner on https://coinhub.news/.
  6. The SEC has really begun cracking down on ICOs (https://www.coindesk.com/after-fridays-sec-actions-experts-say-ico-party-is-truly-over). The developments effectively mark the end of the era of centrally-generated arcade tokens, clearing the path for a fairer, more transparent method of distribution. Userbrn has written a brief article about IMOs and how they could be used to start blockchain projects in a much more accountable manner. https://medium.com/0xbitcoinfoundation/developers-need-to-consider-initial-mining-offerings-on-ethereum-28be23fa05d9
  7. Userbrn submitted a listing application to Bittrex. Don't be bothering him about the progress on it though, since no decent exchange will speculate about listings. If it goes somewhere, then I'm more than sure that we'll know.
  8. Work on the LavaWallet is currently held up by improvements that have yet to be made to Ethereum, but as soon as those get ironed out the ball will surely get rolling again. In the meantime, Infernal_toast has written this short recap of the LavaWallet: "The LavaWallet contract is a custodial token contract and it is entirely non-owned. Any user is allowed to deposit tokens inside and they will be recorded in the contracts ledger for withdraw by that user at any time. Besides just allowing users to deposit and withdraw tokens, the contract also uses ECRecover so that any tokens inside can be spent by any other pre-specified third party who can submit a signed packet of data (a Lava Packet) which had been signed by the token owner to allow this action.This means that a LavaPacket acts just like a digital check. A user creates and signs this check which specifies an amount of tokens to send to a specific party. A reward (in tokens) can be embedded as well such that anyone who pays the ether gas to submit this check back to the contract will receive. Thus, this allows users to indirectly pay for token transfers using only tokens as the fee. The third parties (relayers) will pay the ether for gas. Once a lava packet is submitted, it cannot be submitted again. One clear fault of such a system is that if anyone can be a relayer and submit a lava packet, then packets which are broadcast to everyone will be submitted by everyone in a race and only the first will be successful. The rest will just lose gas and receive no reward, making for an inefficient system. To solve this minor fault, lava packet creators must specify an address called 'relayAuthority' which is either the address of a specific account , who becomes the only valid relayers for that packet , or a specific arbitrary smart contract whose method getAuthority() is called at time of packet submission which may only return a single address at any given time. Therefore this problem is solved and at any given time, there is only a single valid relayer for any LavaPacket, as enfoced by the contract. This means there will be fewer races, fewer failed tx even with packet broadcasting ,and the power is still in the hands of the user.One such example contract for a relayAuthority has been constructed which uses Proof of Stake and cycles through valid stakers in a ~15 minute interval. LavaPacket creators may use this as a relay authority so that the packet can be submitted by any of the 15 stakers, but still at any given time only one will be a valid submitter so there are still no races, still no reason for invalid TXes."
  9. 0xbitcoin's price can be tracked on Binance. What's noteworthy is that it's the only token on the site that does not have an "issue price". While simply being able to view 0xBTC on Binance is definitely not a sign of anything larger, then it does give hope tha- BUY BUY BUY FOMO IN QUICK BEFORE IT'S LISTED https://info.binance.com/en/currencies/0xbitcoin
submitted by MoonMission1001 to 0xbitcoin [link] [comments]

Time to discuss the elephant in the room. Nicehash 51% Attacks.

While I've argued for ProgPoW because I'm not a fan of ASIC manufactures because of their malicious business practices, I think we all know the real problem for PoW security, Hashrate Rental sites. Let's go through a short-list of coins that are listed on Nicehash, where hashpower could be bought and then executed a 51% attack.
Monacoin 51%
BitcoinGold 51%
EthereumClassic 51%
Vertcoin 51%
ZenCash(Now Horizen) 51%
BitcoinPrivate 51% (Ethical Hack)
Nicehash has been the #1 to go to "sell" hashpower for whatever coin they support for BTC and other rental services such as miningrigrental. While we cannot prove that this attacks were used by buying hashpower on nicehash, a ethical hacker Geocold lived streamed how easy it was to attack PoW coin BTCP. "using a couple of hundred dollars’ worth of rented hashpower he’d purchased from Nicehash with BTC" (bitcoin.com). We can assume then that other 51% attacks all follow this method.
Step 1. Buy more Hashpower than the current network using rental services
Step 2. moves coins on the true network to other addresses, makes deposits, then withdraws them to a safe addresses
Step 3. broadcast the untruthful chain to the network
Step 4. this reverts the truthful network.
Step 5. Profit.
Shockingly, several crypto-currencies not only were cheap to attack but also had plenty of hash rate for sale on NiceHash with which such an attack could take place. When 51% attacks were considered in the past, most calculations included the cost of hardware, electricity, and maintenance. But this new “rent-a-attack” method is proving dangerous for smaller networks. (ccn.com)
This is what happened to ETC recently. Few people who were using nicehash services commented that they noticed a pay-bump mining ETH-HASH.
One PoW altcoin team has set up a script to constantly monitor their hashrate. In the event of a spike of over 10%, they will be automatically notified. Should the newly added hashrate emanate from an unknown pool, or be in danger of tipping an existing pool over 50%, they have a large quantity BTC on standby with Nicehash ready to purchase their own firepower to counter the attack (bitcoin.com)
Again it shows the only way that people counter this is to over-bid/buy more hashrate.
While I understand PoS doesn't suffer from these type of attacks. However I find it unreasonable to say PoW is flawed because 51% attacks. Hashrental services we not envisioned by Satoshi's PoW. Any actual mining actors not using hash rentals would need a sizable amount of resources to perform a 51% and double-spend even on small cap coins. Nicehash takes your money and doesn't care.
The elephant Crypto needs to deal with it shutting off nicehash and rental services. After the nicehash hack I know I saw a sizable increase in profits because difficulty dropped on so many coins.
IMHO Nicehash needs to turn-off purchasing hashrate and instead turn to "auto-covert" where they mine the coin that's profitable that day and turn into bitcoin for the user. We wouldn't have the chance of 51% attacks.
submitted by Xazax310 to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

ethtrader Glossary of Terms

I recently introduced a friend to our humble, little subreddit and they quickly pointed out that the language spoken here did not appear to be English. I suppose we do toss around a fair amount of acronyms, memes, and slang. I put together a quick glossary of terms for them and figured I should post it here in case any other new ethtraders can benefit from it:

Trading Related:

Crypto-currency related, but not really specific to Ethereum:

Terms more specific to Ethereum

Memes:

Any mistakes I made? Any terms you would add?
submitted by Basoosh to ethtrader [link] [comments]

BitMax.io(BTMX.io)News Digest 2019 09 23

Major Headlines
  1. Bitcoin falls as futures exchange makes its trading debut
  2. Weekends are for altcoins when it comes to crypto market gains
  3. Google’s quantum “breakthrough” won’t destroy Bitcoin. Not yet.
  4. CoinShares Enlists Customers to Lobby Against UK Ban of Crypto ETN
  5. Bakkt Is Finally Launching Its Bitcoin Futures Today. Here’s What to Expect
  6. Crypto Exchange Giant Binance to Launch US Trading Tuesday
  7. IBM Says It’s Ready to Work with Facebook on Blockchain
  8. PBoC Denies Claims It Will Launch Digital Currency in November
Takeaway
  1. Bitcoin falls as futures exchange makes its trading debut
(All citations are taken from Bloomberg)
· The price of Bitcoin slumped 2.4% to $9,892 as 38 of the futures contracts offered on the Intercontinental exchange inc.’s Bakkt platform had changed hands.
· ICE highlighted the plan in part as a way for merchants to adopt cryptocurrencies as a payment method.
· First hurdle is to get enough traders to use its Bitcoin features.
  1. Weekends are for altcoins when it comes to crypto market gains
(All citations are taken from Bloomberg)
· Ether has bested Bitcoin in terms of daily percentage gains and has outperformed the largest digital currency in eight of the last 12 weekends.
· XRP has also gained over the past month while Bitcoin drops 5%
· Partner of JST Capital says Altcoins will continue to catch up and come to fruition at some level where the value proposition is being recognized more broadly.
  1. Google’s quantum “breakthrough” won’t destroy Bitcoin. Not yet.
(All citations are taken from CNN)
· The promise of an emerging era of quantum computing seemingly became a reality as Google released a new scientific paper.
· Known as Shor’s algorithm, the calculation enables the extraction of the private key from any public key.
· Currently, cryptographically secured public keys are the only safeguard standing in the way between users’ fund and financial ruin.
  1. CoinShares Enlists Customers to Lobby Against UK Ban of Crypto ETN
(All citations are taken from coindesk)
· Investment platform CoinShares is urging its customers to lobby the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) over impending crypto asset regulations.
· In a letter to investors sent today, CoinShares has asked its customers to write emails and text messages to the UK regulator in support of one of its premiere products, exchange-traded notes (ETNs), which would be banned under the proposed regulation for retail investors.
· Similar to a bond, ETNs provide investors with returns based on a market benchmark such as the S&P 500. CoinShares offers exchange-traded products for bitcoin, ethereum, litecoin, and XRP.
  1. Bakkt Is Finally Launching Its Bitcoin Futures Today. Here’s What to Expect
(All citations are taken from coindesk)
· Bakkt, the Intercontinental Exchange-backed bitcoin warehouse and futures contract facilitator is launching Monday, opening the door for institutional investors to take positions on the cryptocurrency in a federally regulated venue.
· Bakkt’s futures will be physically settled. And according to the daily contract’s specifications, the bitcoin will be delivered on the second business day after the contract’s date.
· While Bakkt is also offering a 30-day bitcoin futures contract, the one-day version will essentially allow institutions to buy or sell bitcoin in a way that’s more familiar to them than the helter-skelter world of crypto exchanges.
  1. Crypto Exchange Giant Binance to Launch US Trading Tuesday
(All citations are taken from coindesk)
· Binance.US, the American arm of cryptocurrency exchange giant Binance, has announced it will start trading fiat-crypto and crypto-crypto trading pairs on Tuesday.
· The trading platform will list seven cryptocurrencies immediately upon the launch, including bitcoin, Binance coin (BNB), ethereum, XRP, bitcoin cash, litecoin and Tether’s USDT.
· The move is part of a larger expansion by Binance, which launched a fiat-to-crypto exchange on the island of Jersey, a British self-governing dependency in January.
  1. IBM Says It’s Ready to Work with Facebook on Blockchain
(All citations are taken from coindesk)
· IBM is willing to team up with Facebook to develop blockchain technology, an IBM executive said, explaining that developing the blockchain ecosystem is “a team sport.”
· IBM has been focused on developing its patented Stellar blockchain to facilitate cross-border payments and launched the World Wire, an international payments system that uses Stellar.
· World Wire aims to skip banking intermediaries that add complexity and cost to the traditional international payments systems by replacing them with digital assets sent over a distributed network.
  1. PBoC Denies Claims It Will Launch Digital Currency in November
(All citations are taken from coindesk)
· China’s central bank has denied recent reports that it will launch its national digital currency in November.
· News reports had also suggested that major banks ICBC, the Bank of China and the Agricultural Bank of China, as well as Alibaba, Tencent and UnionPay, would act as outlets for the digital yuan.
· The digital currency is not planned to replace the yuan and would be used in the retail sector and for payments like cash, the PBoC added.
(The contents above are all cited from corresponding websites, and don’t represent the opinion of BitMax.io platform)
submitted by o2ziga to BitMax [link] [comments]

The Perfect BTC Auction Storm: the $830MM in BTC Seized from Infraud and the $1.7 Billion in BTC Seized in Bulgaria

Last week Sergey Medvedev was arrested in Bangkok. This was part of a coordinated international raid that netted the arrest of 13 people across the globe associated with darkweb site "Infraud" as reported widely in the press:
https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/feb/9/sergey-medvedev-russian-cybercrime-suspect-arreste/ https://www.cbsnews.com/news/us-russia-cybercrime-dark-web-market-suspect-sergey-medvedev-thailand/
Apparently, Medvedev was the administrator of the escrow service that Infraud ran to prevent members from ripping each other off in their transactions that seem to have been centered largely on stolen credit card information and devices to steal such info. (See https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/02/u-s-arrests-13-charges-36-in-infraud-cybercrime-forum-bust/).
Since transactions were (of course) conducted using bitcoin, Thai police are reporting that they have seized 100k BTC from Medvedev (worth $830MM USD at the moment). How Thai police could have gotten his private keys is a matter that has been debated on Reddit since the arrest. While one commenter humorously suggested that skillfully applied 50 baht pliers could circumvent any digital security measures, it is obvious that many nefarious forms of "advanced interrogation" could have produced the private keys. What isn't clear, is what will happen to those nearly $1 Billion USD in BTC. Will the Thai police keep them? Will the US Government end up with them? Will they split them? Most importantly, will they be sold off?
The US Marshal's Service obviously has a track record of selling off BTC with the most notable example being the Silk Road Auction in 2014 after the arrest of Ross Ulbricht where Tim Draper and others bought huge chunks of the seizure at auction.
Obviously, an $830 million USD BTC auction would make a lot of headlines and could have a significant impact on BTC markets regardless of what the eventual auction winners planned to do with the coins. But, a lingering question remains: What if Medvedev coins weren't the only ones seized?
The Thai police announced the BTC they seized. But, the coordinated international dragnet also involved law enforcement in the U.S., Britain, Australia, France, Italy, Kosovo, and Serbia. Chances are good that there was additional BTC seized from the other 12 individuals. Luckily, the Department of Justice's Grand Jury Indictment of those people might give us a clue how much the DOJ thought those individuals MIGHT have.
Here is the grand jury indictment of 36 people that led to that arrest. (https://www.justice.gov/opa/press-release/file/1032021/download) As the US gov't is eager to seize any and all ill-gotten gain in such arrests, the document contains a bullet list of how much money the government would like to seize from each of the indicted defendants. The forfeiture list starts on page 46.
In the case of Medvedev, and certain other ringleaders and others, the list just shows "To be calculated". This makes sense since Medvedev was apparently running Infraud's escrow service and the Feds didn't know how much Infraud BTC would be under Medvedev's control. But, for 21 of the other defendants, the indictment does list actual dollar amount. My quick back of the napkin addition is showing that these amounts add up to something like $566,047,662.74. Obviously, it's possible the arrested individuals didn't have these amounts, these amounts were not longer in BTC, the other 12 individuals actually arrested were not the ones on the list that correspond to the higher dollar amounts, or the arresting authorities were unable to recover these amounts. But, these are the amounts the DOJ would have been very happy to seize from these individuals.
But, in any case, it wouldn't be at all surprising if at least another $200 Million in BTC was seized from the other 12 arrested individuals. So, if we add this amount to Medvedev's $830 million, we could easily be talking about $1 Billion USD in BTC.
On top of this $1 Billion in Infraud BTC, we also have yet to account for the 213,519 BTC seized by Bulgarian authorities last May. (See https://www.coindesk.com/bulgarian-government-sitting-3-billion-bitcoin/) Apparently, Bulgaria has been refusing to comment on what has or will happen to those coins. But, what we do know is that those coins would be worth something like $1.7 Billion USD today. So, between these two raids, we would have $2.7 Billion in seized BTC. Here's the nightmare scenario: some combination of the US/Thailand/Others in the Infraud Law Enforcement Coalition decide to auction off the Infraud coins, then Bulgaria doesn't want to get beat to the punch and they decide to auction off their seized coins. All of the sudden, we are staring down the barrel of a $2.7 billion USD BTC auction season. Some will call it far-fetched and impossible. But, the timing is perfect.
The BTC market has basically just been steadily falling since the peak.The Bulgarian authorities seized their coins in May and watched the price skyrocket until December. Why sell since the market was just rising and rising. Now, they have seen the BTC market fall and fall for two months. Last week, the Bulgarians get the news that the US and the other arresting countries may suddenly have their own treasure trove of $1 billion USD in seized BTC. Now there may be two or more players in the mega cap bulk BTC sales game...plus prices are falling. The Bulgarians may just decide to unleash those coins. We already know that the US Marshals are more than happy to auction off huge amounts of coins at a whim. We also know that the press would LOVE to report on billion dollar bitcoin auctions, and that the resulting headlines could very likely affect the behavior of casual investors and newbs: “They’re going to sell a BILLION dollars of them….yeah, hard pass on buying for now.” That could be the case even if it turns out that Bulgaria has already stealthily and slowly sold off their coins.
The only remaining question is, whatever the chance may be of any of this occurring, what would the impact be on the market if some version of this DOES HAPPEN involving any substantial portion of the Infraud and/or Bulgarian coins?
tl;dr We could have a hell of a bulk BTC auction season coming up!
submitted by tap21x to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

BitMax.io(BTMX.io)News Digest 20190812

Major Headlines (Coindesk)

IRS Warnings to Bitcoin Traders Offer Clues to Coming Tax Guidance Bitcoin Price Faces Struggle to Hold Above $11K After Range Breakdown Coinbase UK Dropping Support for Cryptocurrency Zcash Colu May Buy Back ICO Tokens in Pivot Away From Blockchain New Zealand Tax Office Makes It Legal to Pay Salaries in Crypto IBM, Tata Become First Big Techs to Back Hedera Blockchain Goldman Sachs Analysts’ Slide Suggests Now’s a Good Time to Buy Bitcoin China’s Central Bank ‘Close’ to Launching Official Digital Currency

Takeaway

IRS Warnings to Bitcoin Traders Offer Clues to Coming Tax Guidance
· The IRS’ recent warning letters to 10,000 traders offer hints at what its forthcoming guidance on crypto taxes might say.
· While the letters are not guidance, the tea leaves indicate the IRS might be changing its required methods for calculating the value of crypto holdings and the forms and schedules for reporting them.
· Major questions remain unresolved, including how hard forks and airdrops should be treated.
Bitcoin Price Faces Struggle to Hold Above $11K After Range Breakdown
· Bitcoin’s short duration charts indicate the bears are in control and prices could drop below $11,000 in the next 24 hours.
· A strong bounce from the 5- and 10-week moving averages at $10,804 and $10,625, respectively, could fuel a rise back to $12,000.
· A high-volume weekly close (Sunday, UTC) or a back-to-back daily close above $12,000 is needed to revive the bullish outlook.
Coinbase UK Dropping Support for Cryptocurrency Zcash
· The U.K. arm of Coinbase appears to be dropping support for the privacy-focused cryptocurrency zcash.
· The cryptocurrency exchange gave no specific reason for the removal of the cryptocurrency but said all remaining ZEC balances on Aug. 26 will be automatically converted to British pounds in users accounts.
Colu May Buy Back ICO Tokens in Pivot Away From Blockchain
· Blockchain startup Colu will repurchase approximately 54 million tokens sold during its $17 million ICO from those that participated in the crowd-sale.
· The company launched the token project in four cities, including London, Liverpool and Tel Aviv. It received an additional $14.5 million from financial and insurance company IDB Group for the project.
· Professor of behavioral economics: “Colu DLT’s decision to purchase CLN tokens appears unprecedented in the industry. It demonstrates how the Colu Group’s core values guide its actions. The Colu Group is focused on fostering relations between municipalities, local businesses, residents, and other city stakeholders. These relationships rely on the very same kind of trust and consideration, which is now being shown towards CLN token holders. It is wonderful to see the Colu Group following their ethical standards not just in words but in action. Such acts of giving up profits for the benefits of customers, partners, and investors are crucial to this tech sector if we want it to continue to evolve and grow.”
New Zealand Tax Office Makes It Legal to Pay Salaries in Crypto
· New Zealand’s tax office, the Inland Revenue Department (IRD), has made it legal to receive salaries in cryptocurrency, and be taxed accordingly.
· The crypto asset being paid must also be able to be exchanged for fiat currency, and must have the primary purpose of acting like a currency or be pegged to the price of one or more fiat currencies
· As far as tax goes, salaries paid in crypto assets will be treated as PAYE (pay as you earn) income payments. These are deducted by the employer and passed onto the tax department.
IBM, Tata Become First Big Techs to Back Hedera Blockchain
· IBM and Indian telecom company Tata Communications have joined the governance council of Hedera Hashgraph, a blockchain-like public network for enterprises.
· Now, eight of the 39 available spots for governing council members are filled.
· Principal offering manager of the IBM Blockchain Platform: “The most exciting part is the proposed Hedera Consensus Service. It has the potential to provide the core innovation of proof-of-work blockchains, like bitcoin and ethereum, without the performance and privacy trade-offs that are typically associated with these networks.”
Goldman Sachs Analysts’ Slide Suggests Now’s a Good Time to Buy Bitcoin
· Market intel from Goldman Sachs suggests investors should capitalize on the current price dip and buy bitcoin.
· Goldman said that the short-term target for bitcoin (BTC) is $13,971 and that investors should consider buying on any dips in the current scenario.
· Goldman Note: “Any such retracement from $12,916-$13,971 should be viewed as an opportunity to buy on weakness as long as it doesn’t retrace further than the $9,084 low,”
China’s Central Bank ‘Close’ to Launching Official Digital Currency
· Deputy director of the payments unit at the People’s Bank of China (PBoC), said its researchers have been hard at work since last year to complete the systems needed to support the digital yuan offering and that it is “close to being out.”
· Early in July, the former governor of the PBoC Zhou Xiaochuan said that Libra poses a threat to payments systems and national currencies.
· Zhou argued that the Chinese government should “make good preparations and make the Chinese yuan a stronger currency,” and that “commercial entities” could be allowed to issue digital yuans, as Hong Kong allows with its dollar.
(All citations of the News Digest are taken from Coindesk.)
submitted by o2ziga to BitMax [link] [comments]

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