He Fled a Prison in Iceland. Now It’s Good to Be Back ...

NYT article/The Weekly Episode on Epstein Hotlist

Just finished watching The Weekly (it’s kind of a Vice rip-off by the NYT) on Hulu where they went into detail about their story published this week about a « hacker » named Patrick Kessler who claimed to have tens of thousands of hours of Epstein’s private videos.
Turns out, Patrick did not released the videos and there is a lot of questions with his credibility, nonetheless, he clearly exposed two lawyers (Bois and Pottinger) for attempting to profit by offering to reach large settlements in which they would take 40%.
The article is here: Jeffrey Epstein, Blackmail, and a Lucrative Hotlist
Even though it sounds like this guy Kessler is full of shit, I REALLY wish that he wasn’t and at some point these troves of photos and videos get released and a bunch of rich and powerful people get what they deserve for abusing these women.
For those who need access to NYT- it is a long article, but here’s the full text:
By Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Emily Steel, Jacob Bernstein and David Enrich Nov. 30, 2019 Soon after the sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein died in August, a mysterious man met with two prominent lawyers.
Towering, barrel-chested and wild-bearded, he was a prodigious drinker and often wore flip-flops. He went by a pseudonym, Patrick Kessler — a necessity, he said, given the shadowy, dangerous world that he inhabited.
He told the lawyers he had something incendiary: a vast archive of Mr. Epstein’s data, stored on encrypted servers overseas. He said he had years of the financier’s communications and financial records — as well as thousands of hours of footage from hidden cameras in the bedrooms of Mr. Epstein’s properties. The videos, Kessler said, captured some of the world’s richest, most powerful men in compromising sexual situations — even in the act of rape.
Kessler said he wanted to expose these men. If he was telling the truth, his trove could answer one of the Epstein saga’s most baffling questions: How did a college dropout and high school math teacher amass a purported nine-figure fortune? One persistent but unproven theory was that he ran a sprawling blackmail operation. That would explain why moguls, scientists, political leaders and a royal stayed loyal to him, in some cases even after he first went to jail.
Kessler’s tale was enough to hook the two lawyers, the famed litigator David Boies and his friend John Stanley Pottinger. If Kessler was authentic, his videos would arm them with immense leverage over some very important people.
Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger discussed a plan. They could use the supposed footage in litigation or to try to reach deals with men who appeared in it, with money flowing into a charitable foundation. In encrypted chats with Kessler, Mr. Pottinger referred to a roster of potential targets as the “hot list.” He described hypothetical plans in which the lawyers would pocket up to 40 percent of the settlements and could extract money from wealthy men by flipping from representing victims to representing their alleged abusers.
The possibilities were tantalizing — and extended beyond vindicating victims. Mr. Pottinger saw a chance to supercharge his law practice. For Mr. Boies, there was a shot at redemption, after years of criticism for his work on behalf of Theranos and Harvey Weinstein.
In the end, there would be no damning videos, no funds pouring into a new foundation. Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger would go from toasting Kessler as their “whistle-blower” and “informant” to torching him as a “fraudster” and a “spy.”
Kessler was a liar, and he wouldn’t expose any sexual abuse. But he would reveal something else: The extraordinary, at times deceitful measures elite lawyers deployed in an effort to get evidence that could be used to win lucrative settlements — and keep misconduct hidden, allowing perpetrators to abuse again.
Mr. Boies has publicly decried such secret deals as “rich man’s justice,” a way that powerful men buy their way out of legal and reputational jeopardy. This is how it works.
7 men and a headless parrot
The man who called himself Kessler first contacted a Florida lawyer, Bradley J. Edwards, who was in the news for representing women with claims against Mr. Epstein. It was late August, about two weeks after the financier killed himself in a jail cell while awaiting trial on federal sex-trafficking charges.
Mr. Edwards, who did not respond to interview requests, had a law firm called Edwards Pottinger, and he soon referred Kessler to his New York partner. Silver-haired and 79, Mr. Pottinger had been a senior civil-rights official in the Nixon and Ford administrations, but he also dabbled in investment banking and wrote best-selling medical thrillers. He was perhaps best known for having dated Gloria Steinem and Kathie Lee Gifford.
Mr. Pottinger recalled that Mr. Edwards warned him about Kessler, saying that he was “endearing,” “spooky” and “loves to drink like a fish.”
After an initial discussion with Kessler in Washington, Mr. Pottinger briefed Mr. Boies — whose firm was also active in representing accusers in the Epstein case — about the sensational claims. He then invited Kessler to his Manhattan apartment. Kessler admired a wall-mounted frame containing a headless stuffed parrot; on TV, the Philadelphia Eagles were mounting a comeback against the Washington Redskins. Mr. Pottinger poured Kessler a glass of WhistlePig whiskey, and the informant began to talk.
In his conversations with Mr. Pottinger and, later, Mr. Boies, Kessler said his videos featured numerous powerful men who were already linked to Mr. Epstein: Ehud Barak, the former Israeli prime minister; Alan Dershowitz, a constitutional lawyer; Prince Andrew; three billionaires; and a prominent chief executive.
All seven men, or their representatives, told The New York Times they never engaged in sexual activity on Mr. Epstein’s properties. The Times has no reason to believe Kessler’s supposed video footage is real.
In his apartment, Mr. Pottinger presented Kessler with a signed copy of “The Boss,” his 2005 novel. “One minute you’re bending the rules,” blares the cover of the paperback version. “The next minute you’re breaking the law.” On the title page, Mr. Pottinger wrote: “Here’s to the great work you are to do. Happy to be part of it.”
Mr. Pottinger also gave Kessler a draft contract to bring him on as a client, allowing him to use a fake name. “For reasons revealed to you, I prefer to proceed with this engagement under the name Patrick Kessler,” the agreement said.
Despite the enormities of the Epstein scandal, few of his accusers have gotten a sense of justice or resolution. Mr. Pottinger thought Kessler’s files could change everything. This strange man was theatrical and liked his alcohol, but if there was even a chance his claims were true, they were worth pursuing.
“Our clients are said to be liars and prostitutes,” Mr. Pottinger later said in an interview with The Times, “and we now have someone who says, ‘I can give you secret photographic proof of abuse that will completely change the entire fabric of your practice and get justice for these girls.’ And you think that we wouldn’t try to get that?”
A victim becomes a hacker
Mr. Pottinger and Mr. Boies have known each other for years, a friendship forged on bike trips in France and Italy. In legal circles, Mr. Boies was royalty: He was the one who fought for presidential candidate Al Gore before the Supreme Court, took on Microsoft in a landmark antitrust case, and helped obtain the right for gays and lesbians to get married in California.
But then Mr. Boies got involved with the blood-testing start-up Theranos. As the company was being revealed as a fraud, he tried to bully whistle-blowers into not speaking to a Wall Street Journal reporter, and he was criticized for possible conflicts of interest when he joined the company’s board in 2015.
Two years later, Mr. Boies helped his longtime client Harvey Weinstein hire private investigators who intimidated sources and trailed reporters for The Times and The New Yorker — even though Mr. Boies’s firm had worked for The Times on other matters. (The Times fired his firm.)
By 2019, Mr. Boies, 78, was representing a number of Mr. Epstein’s alleged victims. They got his services pro bono, and he got the chance to burnish his legacy. When Mr. Pottinger contacted him about Kessler, he was intrigued.
On Sept. 9, Mr. Boies greeted Kessler at the offices of his law firm, Boies Schiller Flexner, in a gleaming new skyscraper at Hudson Yards on Manhattan’s West Side. Kessler unfurled a fantastic story, one he would embroider and alter in later weeks, that began with him growing up somewhere within a three-hour radius of Washington. Kessler said he had been molested as a boy by a Bible school teacher and sought solace on the internet, where he fell in with a group of victims turned hackers, who used their skills to combat pedophilia.
Kessler claimed that a technology executive had introduced him to Mr. Epstein, who in 2012 hired Kessler to set up encrypted servers to preserve his extensive digital archives. With Mr. Epstein dead, Kessler boasted to the lawyers, he had unfettered access to the material. He said the volume of videos was overwhelming: more than a decade of round-the-clock footage from dozens of cameras.
Kessler displayed some pixelated video stills on his phone. In one, a bearded man with his mouth open appears to be having sex with a naked woman. Kessler said the man was Mr. Barak. In another, a man with black-framed glasses is seen shirtless with a woman on his lap, her breasts exposed. Kessler said it was Mr. Dershowitz. He also said that some of the supposed videos appeared to have been edited and cataloged for the purpose of blackmail.
“This was explosive information if true, for lots and lots of people,” Mr. Boies said in an interview.
Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger had decades of legal experience and considered themselves experts at assessing witnesses’ credibility. While they couldn’t be sure, they thought Kessler was probably legit.
A chance to sway the Israeli election
Within hours of the Hudson Yards meeting, Mr. Pottinger sent Kessler a series of texts over the encrypted messaging app Signal.
According to excerpts viewed by The Times, Mr. Pottinger and Kessler discussed a plan to disseminate some of the informant’s materials — starting with the supposed footage of Mr. Barak. The Israeli election was barely a week away, and Mr. Barak was challenging Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The purported images of Mr. Barak might be able to sway the election — and fetch a high price. (“Total lie with no basis in reality,” Mr. Barak said when asked about the existence of such videos.)
“Can you review your visual evidence to be sure some or all is indisputably him? If so, we can make it work,” Mr. Pottinger wrote.
Kessler said he would do so. Mr. Pottinger sent a yellow smiley-face emoji with its tongue sticking out.
“Can you share your contact that would be purchasing,” Kessler asked.
“Sheldon Adelson,” Mr. Pottinger answered.
Mr. Adelson, a billionaire casino magnate in Las Vegas, had founded one of Israel’s largest newspapers, and it was an enthusiastic booster of Mr. Netanyahu. Mr. Pottinger wrote that he and Mr. Boies hoped to fly to Nevada to meet with Mr. Adelson to discuss the images.
“Do you believe that adelson has the pull to insure this will hurt his bid for election?” Kessler asked the next morning.
Mr. Pottinger reassured him. “There is no question that Adelson has the capacity to air the truth about EB if he wants to,” he said, using Mr. Barak’s initials. He said he planned to discuss the matter with Mr. Boies that evening.
Mr. Boies confirmed that they discussed sharing the photo with Mr. Adelson but said the plan was never executed. Boaz Bismuth, the editor in chief of the newspaper, Israel Hayom, said its journalists were approached by an Israeli source who pitched them supposed images of Mr. Barak, but that “we were not interested.”
‘These are wealthy wrongdoers’
The men whom Kessler claimed to have on tape were together worth many billions. Some of their public relations teams had spent months trying to tamp down media coverage of their connections to Mr. Epstein. Imagine how much they might pay to make incriminating videos vanish.
You might think that lawyers representing abuse victims would want to publicly expose such information to bolster their clients’ claims. But that is not how the legal industry always works. Often, keeping things quiet is good business.
One of the revelations of the #MeToo era has been that victims’ lawyers often brokered secret deals in which alleged abusers paid to keep their accusers quiet and the allegations out of the public sphere. Lawyers can pocket at least a third of such settlements, profiting off a system that masks misconduct and allows men to abuse again.
Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger said in interviews that they were looking into creating a charity to help victims of sexual abuse. It would be bankrolled by private legal settlements with the men on the videos.
Mr. Boies acknowledged that Kessler might get paid. “If we were able to use this to help our victims recover money, we would treat him generously,” he said in September. He said that his firm would not get a cut of any settlements.
Such agreements would have made it less likely that videos involving the men became public. “Generally what settlements are about is getting peace,” Mr. Boies said.
Mr. Pottinger told Kessler that the charity he was setting up would be called the Astria Foundation — a name he later said his girlfriend came up with, in a nod to Astraea, the Greek goddess of innocence and justice. “We need to get it funded by abusers,” Mr. Pottinger texted, noting in another message that “these are wealthy wrongdoers.”
Mr. Pottinger asked Kessler to start compiling incriminating materials on a specific group of men.
“I’m way ahead of you,” Kessler responded. He said he had asked his team of fellow hackers to search the files for the three billionaires, the C.E.O. and Prince Andrew.
“Yes, that’s exactly how to do this,” Mr. Pottinger said. “Videos for sure, but email traffic, too.”
“I call it our hot list,” he added.
Image The Grand Sichuan restaurant in Manhattan. The Grand Sichuan restaurant in Manhattan.Credit...Stephanie Diani for The New York Times A quiet table at the back of Grand Sichuan
In mid-September, Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger invited reporters from The Times to the Boies Schiller offices to meet Kessler. The threat of a major news organization writing about the videos — and confirming the existence of an extensive surveillance apparatus — could greatly enhance the lawyers’ leverage over the wealthy men.
Before the session, Mr. Pottinger encouraged Kessler to focus on certain men, like Mr. Barak, while avoiding others. Referring to the reporters, he added, “Let them drink from a fountain instead of a water hose. They and the readers will follow that better.”
The meeting took place on a cloudy Saturday morning. After agreeing to leave their phones and laptops outside, the reporters entered a 20th-floor conference room. Kessler was huge: more than 6 feet tall, pushing 300 pounds, balding, his temples speckled with gray. He told his story and presented images that he said were of Mr. Epstein, Mr. Barak and Mr. Dershowitz having sex with women.
Barely an hour after the session ended, the Times reporters received an email from Kessler: “Are you free?” He said he wanted to meet — alone. “Tell no one else.” That afternoon, they met at Grand Sichuan, an iconic Chinese restaurant in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. The lunch rush was over, and the trio sat at a quiet table in the back. A small group of women huddled nearby, speaking Mandarin and snipping the ends off string beans.
Kessler complained that Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger were more interested in making money than in exposing wrongdoers. He pulled out his phone, warned the reporters not to touch it, and showed more of what he had. There was a color photo of a bare-chested, gray-haired man with a slight smile. Kessler said it was a billionaire. He also showed blurry, black-and-white images of a dark-haired man receiving oral sex. He said it was a prominent C.E.O.
Soup dumplings and Gui Zhou chicken arrived, and Kessler kept talking. He said he had found financial ledgers on Mr. Epstein’s servers that showed he had vast amounts of Bitcoin and cash in the Middle East and Bangkok, and hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of gold, silver and diamonds. He presented no proof. But it is common for whistle-blowers to be erratic and slow to produce their evidence, and The Times thought it was worth investigating Kessler’s claims.
The conversation continued in a conference room at a Washington hotel five days later, after a text exchange in which Kessler noted his enthusiasm for Japanese whiskey. Both parties brought bottles to the hotel, and Kessler spent nearly eight hours downing glass after glass. He veered from telling tales about the dark web to professing love for “Little House on the Prairie.” He asserted that he had evidence Mr. Epstein had derived his wealth through illicit means. At one point, he showed what he said were classified C.I.A. documents.
Kessler said he had no idea who the women in the videos were or how the lawyers might go about identifying them to act on their behalf. From his perspective, he said, it seemed like Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger were plotting to use his footage to demand huge sums from billionaires. He said it looked like blackmail — and that he could prove it.
‘We keep it. We keep everything’
Was Kessler’s story plausible? Did America’s best-connected sexual predator accumulate incriminating videos of powerful men?
Two women who spent time in Mr. Epstein’s homes said the answer was yes. In an unpublished memoir, Virginia Giuffre, who accused Mr. Epstein of making her a “sex slave,” wrote that she discovered a room in his New York mansion where monitors displayed real-time surveillance footage. And Maria Farmer, an artist who accused Mr. Epstein of sexually assaulting her when she worked for him in the 1990s, said that Mr. Epstein once walked her through the mansion, pointing out pin-sized cameras that he said were in every room.
“I said, ‘Are you recording all this?’” Ms. Farmer said in an interview. “He said, ‘Yes. We keep it. We keep everything.’”
During a 2005 search of Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach, Fla., estate, the police found two cameras hidden in clocks — one in the garage and the other next to his desk, according to police reports. But no other cameras were found.
Kessler claimed to have been an early investor in a North Carolina coffee company, whose sticker was affixed to his laptop. But its founder said no one matching Kessler’s description had ever been affiliated with the company. Kessler insisted that he invested in 2009, but the company wasn’t founded until 2011.
The contents of Kessler’s supposed C.I.A. documents turned out to be easily findable using Google. At one point, Kessler said that one of his associates had been missing and was found dead; later, Kessler said the man was alive and in the southern United States. He said that his mother had died when he was young — and that he had recently given her a hug. A photo he sent from what he said was a Washington-area hospital featured a distinctive blanket, but when The Times called local hospitals, they didn’t recognize the pattern.
After months of effort, The Times could not learn Kessler’s identity or confirm any element of his back story.
“I am very often being purposefully inconsistent,” Kessler said, when pressed.
A Weinstein cameo
On the last Friday in September, Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger sat on a blue leather couch in the corner of a members-only dining room at the Harvard Club in Midtown Manhattan. Antlered animal heads and oil paintings hung from the dark wooden walls.
The lawyers were there to make a deal with The Times. Tired of waiting for Kessler’s motherlode, Mr. Pottinger said they planned to send a team overseas to download the material from his servers. He said he had alerted the F.B.I. and a prosecutor in the United States attorney’s office in Manhattan.
Mr. Boies told an editor for The Times that they would be willing to share everything, on one condition: They would have discretion over which men could be written about, and when. He explained that if compromising videos about particular men became public, that could torpedo litigation or attempts to negotiate settlements. The Times editor didn’t commit.
Mr. Boies and Mr. Pottinger later said those plans had hinged on verifying the videos’ authenticity and on having clients with legitimate legal claims against the men. Otherwise, legal experts said, it might have crossed the line into extortion.
The meeting was briefly interrupted when Bob Weinstein, the brother of Harvey Weinstein, bounded up to the table and plopped onto the couch next to Mr. Boies. The two men spent several minutes talking, laughing and slapping each other on the back.
While Mr. Boies and Mr. Weinstein chatted, Mr. Pottinger furtively displayed the black-and-white shot of a man in glasses having sex. Both lawyers said it looked like Mr. Dershowitz.
‘You don’t keep your glasses on when you’re doing that’
One day in late September, Mr. Dershowitz’s secretary relayed a message: Someone named Patrick Kessler wanted to speak to him about Mr. Boies.
“The problem is that they don’t want to move forward with any of these people legally,” Kessler said. “They’re just interested in trying to settle and take a cut.”
“Who are these people that you have on videotape?” Mr. Dershowitz asked.
“There’s a lot of people,” Kessler said, naming a few powerful men. He added, “There’s a long list of people that they want me to have that I don’t have.”
“Who?” Mr. Dershowitz asked. “Did they ask about me?”
“Of course they asked about you. You know that, sir.”
“And you don’t have anything on me, right?”
“I do not, no,” Kessler said.
“Because I never, I never had sex with anybody,” Mr. Dershowitz said. Later in the call, he added, “I am completely clean. I was at Jeffrey’s house. I stayed there. But I didn’t have any sex with anybody.”
What was the purpose of Kessler’s phone call? Why did he tell Mr. Dershowitz that he wasn’t on the supposed surveillance tapes, contradicting what he had said and showed to Mr. Boies, Mr. Pottinger and The Times? Did the call sound a little rehearsed?
Mr. Dershowitz said that he didn’t know why Kessler contacted him, and that the phone call was the only time the two men ever spoke. When The Times showed him one of Kessler’s photos, in which a bespectacled man resembling Mr. Dershowitz appears to be having sex, Mr. Dershowitz laughed and said the man wasn’t him. His wife, Carolyn Cohen, peeked at the photo, too.
“You don’t keep your glasses on when you’re doing that,” she said.
Data set (supposedly) to self-destruct
In early October, Kessler said he was ready to produce the Epstein files. He told The Times that he had created duplicate versions of Mr. Epstein’s servers. He laid out detailed logistical plans for them to be shipped by boat to the United States and for one of his associates — a very short Icelandic man named Steven — to deliver them to The Times headquarters at 11 a.m. on Oct. 3.
Kessler warned that he was erecting a maze of security systems. First, a Times employee would need to use a special thumb drive to access a proprietary communications system. Then Kessler’s colleague would transmit a code to decrypt the files. If his instructions weren’t followed precisely, Kessler said, the information would self-destruct.
Specialists at The Times set up a number of “air-gapped” laptops — disconnected from the internet — in a windowless, padlocked meeting room. Reporters cleared their schedules to sift through thousands of hours of surveillance footage.
On the morning of the scheduled delivery, Kessler sent a series of frantic texts. Disaster had struck. A fire was burning. The duplicate servers were destroyed. One of his team members was missing. He was fleeing to Kyiv.
Two hours later, Kessler was in touch with Mr. Pottinger and didn’t mention any emergency. Kessler said he hoped that the footage would help pry $1 billion in settlements out of their targets, and asked him to detail how the lawyers could extract the money. “Could you put together a hypothetical situation,” Kessler wrote, not something “set in stone but close to what your thinking.”
In one, which he called a “standard model” for legal settlements, Mr. Pottinger said the money would be split among his clients, the Astria Foundation, Kessler and the lawyers, who would get up to 40 percent.
In the second hypothetical, Mr. Pottinger wrote, the lawyers would approach the videotaped men. The men would then hire the lawyers, ensuring that they would not get sued, and “make a contribution to a nonprofit as part of the retainer.”
“No client is actually involved in this structure,” Mr. Pottinger said, noting that the arrangement would have to be “consistent with and subject to rules of ethics.”
“Thank you very much,” Kessler responded.
Mr. Pottinger later said that the scenario would have involved him representing a victim, settling a case and then representing the victim’s alleged abuser. He said it was within legal boundaries. (He also said he had meant to type “No client lawsuit is actually involved.”)
Such legal arrangements are not unheard-of. Lawyers representing a former Fox News producer who had accused Bill O’Reilly of sexual harassment reached a settlement in which her lawyers agreed to work for Mr. O’Reilly after the dispute. But legal experts generally consider such setups to be unethical because they can create conflicts between the interests of the lawyers and their original clients.
‘I just pulled it out of my behind’
The lawyers held out hope of getting Kessler’s materials. But weeks passed, and nothing arrived. At one point, Mr. Pottinger volunteered to meet Kessler anywhere — including Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia.
“I still believe he is what he purported to be,” Mr. Boies wrote in an email on Nov. 7. “I have to evaluate people for my day job, and he seemed too genuine to be a fake, and I very much want him to be real.” He added, “I am not unconscious of the danger of wanting to believe something too much.”
Ten days later, Mr. Boies arrived at The Times for an on-camera interview. It was a bright, chilly Sunday, and Mr. Boies had just flown in from Ecuador, where he said he was doing work for the finance ministry. Reporters wanted to ask him plainly if his and Mr. Pottinger’s conduct with Kessler crossed ethical lines.
Would they have brokered secret settlements that buried evidence of wrongdoing? Did the notion of extracting huge sums from men in exchange for keeping sex tapes hidden meet the definition of extortion?
Mr. Boies said the answer to both questions was no. He said he and Mr. Pottinger operated well within the law. They only intended to pursue legal action on behalf of their clients — in other words, that they were a long way from extortion. In any case, he said, he and Mr. Pottinger had never authenticated any of the imagery or identified any of the supposed victims, much less contacted any of the men on the “hot list.”
Then The Times showed Mr. Boies some of the text exchanges between Mr. Pottinger and Kessler. Mr. Boies showed a flash of anger and said it was the first time he was seeing them.
By the end of the nearly four-hour interview, Mr. Boies had concluded that Kessler was probably a con man: “I think that he was a fraudster who was just trying to set things up.” And he argued that Kessler had baited Mr. Pottinger into writing things that looked more nefarious than they really were. He acknowledged that Mr. Pottinger had used “loose language” in some of his messages that risked creating the impression that the lawyers were plotting to monetize evidence of abuse.
Several days later, Mr. Boies returned for another interview and was more critical of Mr. Pottinger, especially the hypothetical plans that he had described to Kessler. “Having looked at all that stuff in context, I would not have said that,” he said. How did Mr. Boies feel about Mr. Pottinger invoking his name in messages to Kessler? “I don’t like it,” he said.
But Mr. Boies stopped short of blaming Mr. Pottinger for the whole mess. “I’m being cautious not to throw him under the bus more than I believe is accurate,” he said. His longtime P.R. adviser, Dawn Schneider, who had been pushing for a more forceful denunciation, dropped her pen, threw up her arms and buried her head in her hands.
In a separate interview, The Times asked Mr. Pottinger about his correspondence with Kessler. The lawyer said that his messages shouldn’t be taken at face value because, in reality, he had been deceiving Kessler all along — “misleading him deliberately in order to get the servers.”
The draft retention agreement that Mr. Pottinger had given to Kessler in September was unsigned and never meant to be honored, Mr. Pottinger said. And he never intended to sell photos of Mr. Barak to Mr. Adelson. “I just pulled it out of my behind,” he said, describing it as an act to impress Kessler.
As for the two hypotheticals about how to get money out of the men on the list, Mr. Pottinger said, he never planned to do what he carefully articulated. “I didn’t owe Patrick honesty about this,” he said.
Mr. Pottinger said that he had only one regret — that “we did not get the information that this liar said he had.”
He added, “I’m building legal cases here. I’m trying not to engage too much in shenanigans. I wish I didn’t, but this guy was very unusual.”
submitted by FollyGoLightly to Epstein [link] [comments]

The Green Energy Conspiracy - A Lie Bigger Than God

You are being lied to on an epic scale so vast it defies human understanding.
Here's Paul Beckwith on why the COP shin digs don't work. You got small African countries sending hundreds of delegates to these conferences for little more than an exotic vacation. These conferences are not populated by great minds, they're peopled by politicians and media whores.

Why Huge Climate Policy and Science Conferences Fail

https://youtu.be/RMRNRomEuEU

James Hansen said at the last COP soiree that after 20 years of trying, solawind energy power just 1% of Total World Energy Demand.

James Hansen at #COP23: Nuclear Power? Are Renewables Enough?

https://youtu.be/YutnsTMi0i4

James Hansen: 2 Degrees is a Recipe for Disaster

https://youtu.be/gDP8xH_Qmls
The world gets over 80% of its energy from fossil fuels. The Paris agreement says that we have to reduce fossil energy 95% below 1990 levels by 2050, yet GDP is going to grow 300% by then. We are promising to do this just to keep temperatures from rising over 2 C. James Hansen calls 2 C a "disaster". It's like taking a child to the edge of a cliff and telling them they'll float up to heaven if they jump off.

The Insane Paris Climate Accord - Dr Roger Bezdek

https://youtu.be/rxJfwWiherg
Kevin Anderson says we have 95% chance of failure staying below 2 C. Remember, 2 C is a disaster, we have a 5% chance of achieving "disaster" and a 95% chance of catastrophic cascading collapse by 2050, which is 30 years away.

Kevin Anderson & Hugh Hunt - Quit the loose talk on climate change and let's get serious!

https://youtu.be/skilmEHMsMc
It gets better, the big lie that is. We also have to reduce emissions to zero by 2050. We have to reduce emissions to zero, reduce fossil use 95% and triple GDP in 30 years. This is absolutely fucking impossible.

What it takes to limit Climate to 2C (Visualization)

https://youtu.be/PB0YQoMFJ-E
We have to grow the economy 300%, reduce emissions 100% all for a 5% chance of restraining events to the "disaster" level. No matter what Bill McKibben and Naomi Klein say, this is 1000% impossible.
Meanwhile, worst-case global warming predictions are the most accurate, and there is a 93% chance that global warming will exceed 4C by the end of this century.

The Big Cook

https://youtu.be/risEN6LFv10

collapse daily links

Alaskan North Slope climate change just outran one of our tools to measure it (climate.gov)

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/beyond-data/alaskan-north-slope-climate-change-just-outran-one-our-tools-measure
I think a camera fell over

How climate denial papers get written: the authors choose a conclusion, then cherry-pick arguments and evidence (twitter.com)

https://twitter.com/zcolman/status/938824437780176897
That's how I got crushed by the weight of a billion collapse cherries

The Bitcoin network consumes as much energy as Denmark. (arstechnica.com)

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/12/bitcoins-insane-energy-consumption-explained/
These guys get 50% of their renewable energy burning imported trees

GE to cut 12000 power-division jobs in bid to keep up with shift to renewable energy (bostonglobe.com)

https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/12/07/cut-power-division-jobs-bid-keep-with-shift-renewable-energy/BzqTunIVwscjY0y5XvpoHK/story.html
We call it green growth

Desertification and Drought: An Issue Even in the Tropical Zone (wildlifealliance.org)

https://www.wildlifealliance.org/desertification-drought-issue-tropical-zone/

In a Warming California, a Future of More Fire (nytimes.com)

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/07/climate/california-fires-warming.html
Coal powered electric cars won't stop it

Global Warming’s Worst-Case Projections Look Increasingly Likely (technologyreview.com)

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609620/global-warmings-worst-case-projections-look-increasingly-likely/

3 Largest Meat Producers Rival Exxon in Greenhouse Gas Emissions - JBS, Cargill & Tyson emitted more greenhouse gas last year than all of France. (alternet.org)

https://www.alternet.org/animal-rights/three-largest-meat-producers-rival-exxon-greenhouse-gas-emissions

According to scientists, the Great Barrier Reef can no longer be saved (absolute-knowledge.com)

https://www.absolute-knowledge.com/great-barrier-reef-cant-be-saved/
Come on, you knew that already if you read collapse daily

Health risks of shipping pollution have been 'underestimated' One giant container ship can emit almost the same amount of cancer and asthma-causing chemicals as 50m cars, study finds (theguardian.com)

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2009/ap09/shipping-pollution
That's why transport is exempt from the Paris accord

Malawi suffers blackouts as drought exposes 98% reliance on hydro power: Shire river, which generates almost all of the country’s power, has fallen to critical levels, leaving major cities struggling. (theguardian.com)

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/08/malawi-blackouts-drought-hydro-power
Dams are major methane emitters, the US has 75,000 dams

Humans may be scaring narwhals to death (popsci.com)

https://www.popsci.com/narwhal-escape-maneuvers-human-scared-death
They scare me to death

Irish sea level rising 3.5cm a decade since the early 1990s. Climate study finds average annual rainfall has risen, and flash flood patterns have changed (irishtimes.com)

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/irish-sea-level-rising-3-5cm-a-decade-since-the-early-1990s-1.3319367
My dad was an Irish lullaby fanatic

Wealthier people produce more carbon pollution — even the “green” ones (vox.com)

https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2017/12/1/16718844/green-consumers-climate-change
News for editors

The Bitcoin boom may be a disaster for the environment (money.cnn.com)

http://money.cnn.com/2017/12/07/technology/bitcoin-energy-environment/index.html
CNN gets its blame ducks in a row in case TSHTF

Forests Are the Key to Fresh Water

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171207095007.htm
We lost 75 million acres last year and northern Europe gets 50% of its "renewable electricity" burning trees shipped there by heavily polluting cargo ships exempt from emissions control.

Can Humans Survive?

https://www.ecoshock.org/2017/12/can-humans-survive.html
The Plutocene: a hot radioactive world

Bitcoin Doesn’t Exist (Automatic Earth)

https://www.theautomaticearth.com/2017/12/bitcoin-doesnt-exist-3/
News Flash: neither does real money, only energy exists

The beautiful Icelandic tradition of giving books on Christmas Eve, TreeHugger

https://www.treehugger.com/culture/icelanders-give-books-christmas-eve.html
Treehugger wants to turn trees into books for Xmas? If so, are they blind to the irony?

Canola oil linked to worsened memory and learning ability in Alzheimer’s MedicalXPress

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-12-canola-oil-linked-worsened-memory.html
Explains my vascular dementia, because there's no way the booze and weed are responsible

Private War: Erik Prince Has His Eye On Afghanistan’s Rare Metals, Buzzfeed

https://www.buzzfeed.com/aramroston/private-war-erik-prince-has-his-eye-on-afghanistans-rare
No war, no green energy wet dreams

Warrantless Surveillance Can Continue Even if Law Expires, Officials Say New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/06/us/politics/warrantless-surveillance-legislation-section-702.html
submitted by BeezelyBillyBub to conspiracy [link] [comments]

I spent the last year traveling the world, trying to capture the tale of Bitcoin

Hey bitcoin,
Over the last year I took time off from my job as a reporter at the New York Times and traveled to Tokyo, Beijing, Buenos Aires, Washington DC, San Francisco, Lake Tahoe and Iceland (among other places) to capture the story of Bitcoin, going back to Satoshi’s White Paper and beyond that to the Cypherpunk experiments of the 1990s.
The book, Digital Gold, is being released by Harper Collins on May 19 — there’s more info at my website: www.nathanielpopper.com. It’s already gotten some nice notice from people like Walter Isaacson and Larry Summers. Even for die-hard Bitcoiners there should be lots of great new stories and insights about everyone from Hal Finney to Bill Gates.
I’ve followed bitcoin closely and learned a lot here. I know the importance of the community here, so starting this week, in the run up to the book’s release, I’ll be posting exclusive material to bitcoin — stuff that ended up on the cutting room floor but that should be fascinating for people steeped in Bitcoinia, like everyone here. (New emails from Satoshi, inside stuff from Mt Gox and things like that.)
I’ll also be putting fun facts from the book on my Facebook page and Twitter. Let me know if you have thoughts on other ways to get this word out. As an author I was very lucky to find my way Bitcoin. It has been, as you all know, a great story.
In the meantime, you can help the book out by pre-ordering a copy on Amazon. If you want to pay with Bitcoin, Overstock will let you do that.
Thanks for reading,
Nathaniel
submitted by nathanielpopper to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Disaster averted: How I would go about addressing climate change

There is a lot of despair surrounding climate change lately, because the future we had hoped for did not unfold. The despair is justified to a large degree, as a lot of things have gone terrible wrong. As an example, the Americans have decided to elect a president who doesn't want to commit to reducing carbon emissions and instead wants to subsidize the dying coal industry.
I don't feel like delving too much into the question of what causes this delusional mentality, nor do I feel like addressing the various arguments people have come up with to justify sticking their heads into the sand. Today I'd rather look at some of the things we can still do, to preserve a habitable planet. Even if the catastrophic predictions about positive feedback loops that go around turn out to be correct, it's unjustified to state that all hope is lost. There's a lot that can still be done, that people haven't adequately considered. I hope to cover some of those projects today.

Emergency interventions for threatened ecosystems

You might have seen some of the studies that came out, arguing that limiting the temperature rise to 1.5 degree Celsius would be insufficient to save most of the world's coral reefs. The coral reefs seem to be the most urgently threatened ecosystems out there. However, there are a number of emergency measures we can take, that would help us to buy time to prevent the coral reefs from dying.
As an example, we can emit sulfates into the atmosphere, that block sunlight. It's estimated that one kilogram of well-placed sulfates, can offset the effects of hundreds of thousands of kilogram of carbon dioxide. Studies have been done on this subject, which found that placing sulphates into the atmosphere, would help us to prevent the coral reefs from dying. Other emergence measures for the coral reefs are discussed here.
Important of course to note is that the coral reefs aren't just at risk of extreme temperatures, they're threatened by ocean acification too. However, ocean acidification can also be addressed to some degree as well. Seaweed takes up carbon from the ocean when it grows, thus locally reducing the Ph of the ocean. Studies are being done, that look at protecting coral reefs, by building seaweed farms near the coral reefs. The seaweed farms are found to be able to buy us anywhere between 7 to 21 years.
Of course, it's important to note that we first need to ensure that seaweed cultivation becomes economically viable on such a large scale. A good start would be to start eating seaweed. Globally, seaweed cultivation is the fastest growing crop, growing by an estimated 8% per year. Billions of people worldwide receive too little iodine in their diet, including an estimated 70% of people in the United Kingdom. I personally try to eat a lot of seaweed. If the seaweed industry grows fast enough, costs may eventually drop down enough, to allow us to feed seaweed to our pets and to farm animals, before we will eventually use seaweed as a form of biomass for renewable energy.

The meat industry

The Japanese eat a third of the amount of meat Americans eat, but live four years longer on average, with far less obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer. I think humans benefit from some animal products in their diet, but we certainly don't need as much meat in our diet as we eat in the Western world. The ideal scenario would be if we could eliminate the consumption of all domesticated vertebrates. Instead, the main meat we would continue to eat would be from shellfish.
We're approaching the point where we can grow meat in labs, at commercially viable prices. When this happens the amount of land needed to produce meat is reduced by 99%, while greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by 78-96%. Globally, the vast majority of the land we use, is used to grow animals who end up as meat on our dinner plate.
It's clear that if lab-grown meat can be deployed on a large enough scale, large-scale reforestation of the planet becomes a viable objective to pursue. Many farms will go bankrupt, while massive migrations from the countryside towards the city will occur, as new jobs will emerge in cities, at the cost of rural lands. Governments can and should encourage this development. An easy way to encourage this development, would be to level the playing field. You don't need to subsidize lab-grown meat, we can easily stand on our own feed. Instead, get rid of your agricultural subsidies for meat production.
I'm all in favor of Britain withdrawing from the EU, because the EU pumps billions of dollars every year into an unsustainable form of agriculture that puts our planet on the path towards global annihilation while filling the pockets of blue-blooded aristocrats who happen to have inherited a lot of land, most of which was simply stolen over successive generations.

Renewable energy

I have long been skeptical, but it's clear to me now that an economy based on renewable energy can function. It might not be easy and it may take some adaptation, but we can sustain civilization without fossil fuels. The big argument generally brought up against renewable energy is that renewable energy is an intermittent form of energy.
However, this doesn't have to be a significant problem, if we consider the simple fact that our civilization can learn to use energy on an intermittent basis. As an example, a house that's well insulated can lose 1 degree Celsius of heat, when it goes four hours without being heated. Thus, if you're dealing with intermittent electricity, excess electricity could quite easily be used to heat the house.
How would you go about using excess electricity to heat your house? I can think of many ways, but here's an example: If your computer is using Boinc, it could quite easily be set up to start grinding once electricity prices are cheap and temperatures in your house are low. Once Gridcoin becomes a success, this will actually earn you money. Similarly, when your refrigerator is closed, like it generally is during the night, it can quite easily go a few hours without cooling. Appliances can quite easily be designed to work with the reality of intermittent electricity.
Of course I'm not suggesting here that we could cope with a world where everything runs on intermittent solar and wind, with zero storage. Fortunately, to some degree we will find ourselves able to store electricity. Electrical cars can be used to donate electricity to the grid, during moments of (looming) shortage. In addition to this, we will always maintain a source of electricity that's not intermittent: Biomass. In the ideal scenario, we will create giant seaweed farms, where seaweed is grown that's then burned in our current coal plants. The carbon that's emitted when the seaweed is burned can then be used for various purposes, rather than being dumped into the atmosphere.
I often see the argument proposed that some solution can't be scaled. There is not enough lithium for electrical cars, there is not enough lead for batteries, there is not enough land for biofuels, there are not enough empty roofs for solar panels, etcetera. What's forgotten in these arguments, is that none of these solutions will have to stand on their own. Climate change is not an easy problem, but it's a problem that's going to be solved by applying many different solutions. Some societies will be successful at this and succeed, others will fail and become failed states. America under Trump is likely to join the latter category.
Another issue that's forgotten, is the fact that we're really spoiled, to a degree that it harms us. What would happen if Americans would suddenly have their electricity supply drop by fifty percent? If they can't learn to use electricity more efficiently, they would have to return to the standard of living they had in the 1960's. Did people die of hunger in the streets back then? As far as I can tell, they played more card and board games and went out more, rather than staring at screens. I think if we lost fifty percent of our electricity supply, we would be miserable for a few months, before we would breathe a sigh of relief and learn to deal with it. To me, the real question is whether we have the willpower to do what needs to be done, not whether it can be done or not.

Carbon sequestration

I've already shown that we can free large amounts of land through lab-grown meat, that can then be used to grow enormous forests that will sequester carbon dioxide. The Amazon rainforest can be restored to its original extent, if we play our cards right.
However, it doesn't stop here. We have alternative methods of carbon sequestration available to us too. If we covered 9% of the world's oceans with seaweed, we could sequester all the carbon dioxide we emit per year today. The reality remains that most of the ocean consists of deserts, where nothing can live because seaweed, corals and shellfish don't have the attachment points to grow and develop a rich ecosystem.
You might have seen some of the nature documentaries, where an old ship is dumped at the right location, to make an artificial coral reef. This can be done in many ways, for many different organisms. Wind farms in the North Sea were discovered a few months ago to serve as perfect places for oysters to attach to. These oysters grow there now and attract other animals, that live off the oysters.
In a similar manner, humans can grow seaweed in places, simply by creating attachment points for these plants. We're used to destroying ecosystems, turning giant forests into deserts as we have done around the world. What we're capable of doing too, is turning oceanic deserts into giant underwater forests. It doesn't require intense effort, we're already doing it by accident, as the wind turbines in the North Sea have demonstrated.
When we grow biomass, we think of it as a carbon-neutral form of energy production. We can easily turn it into a carbon-negative form of energy production however, simply by using the carbon dioxide. There are many different forms of carbon sequestration. The most promising perhaps, is to build with carbon-negative concrete, which is concrete that's built using carbon dioxide.
Concrete production currently causes 5% of all global CO2 emissions. It's thought however, that we can produce concrete that sequesters twice as much carbon as regular concrete emits. We would thus be able to reduce CO2 emisisons by 15%, simply by replacing all of our current concrete with this new carbon-negative concrete.
The curve of technology adaptation is becoming steeper. Whereas it took a century before most people in Western nations had cars, it took ten years before most of us had internet. How fast do you think we can transition to 100% carbon-negative concrete? I think this can be accomplished within a few years, if we're willing to make the transition.
Similarly, in Iceland, power plants are being developed that sequester carbon dioxide while generating energy. Of course the amount sequestered is not enormous yet, the equivalent of 150 Bitcoin transactions, but it's a first step in the right direction.

Cognitive enhancement

I think this solution is important to note, even if it will seem like far-fetched science-fiction to some of you. This is ultimately a solution on which every above solution will come to depend. We're used to problems that have a singular unified solution. Climate change is not such a problem, it requires reconfiguring our entire carbon-based economy. We will find ourselves faced with a situation that may require hundreds of small solutions, rather than one single big solution. This requires intelligent people, who are capable of discovering and implementing such solutions.
What we need right now is a cultural transition, that will lead people to take this problem seriously. When people take the problem seriously, they'll take the solutions seriously and move towards implementing them. One important thing we've noted, is that people's environmental attitude, is strongly linked to their ability to delay gratification. People who are able to delay gratification, desire to take care of the environment they inhabit. Delayed gratification in turn, is a product of intelligence.
When we look at societies where people try to take care of the environment they inhabit, we find that the people there tend to be relatively intelligent. Consider for example, the two nations where the highest percentage of the population considers climate change to be caused by human activity: South Korea and Japan. South Koreans and Japanese people are among the most intelligent people on the planet. Similarly, Chinese people score at the top of the list.
Why do Americans stick their heads into the sand? Why do they vote for leaders who pretend the problem isn't real? Why are you guaranteed to have some American numbnuts show up in the comment section of any article about climate change, insisting that we'll soon have a solar minimum that will somehow end the problem, that the climate has always changed, that volcanoes actually emit more CO2 than humans, that carbon dioxide makes plants grow, that climate change is actually caused by poor Indians and Africans who have too many children rather than by Americans, or that it only seems like the Earth is warming because of measuring stations located near cities?
The answer is, that on average Americans are simply not very intelligent people. Keep in mind, that 41% of Americans genuinely believe that Jesus will return to Earth before the year 2050. Besides lacking intelligence, they lack the ability to think critically. They're good at selectively seeking out information they already want to believe. Like a bunch of parrots in a tree they'll blindly copy whatever they're hearing and amplify each other's stupidity to soothe their nerves. We can discuss all of the various reasons why Americans are not very intelligent and poorly capable of critical thought in a later essay. It's worth noting however, that most Americans suffer from very poor health, which diminishes their innate cognitive potential.
Imagine if the whole world had the level of intelligence of Japanese or South Korean people. People there have birth rates and immigration policies that ensure their population is gradually declining. Japanese people eat a third of the meat American people eat. In addition, Japanese people emit 70% less CO2 in transportation, than Americans.
The reality we're dealing with, is that our problem would be relatively easy to solve, if we lived on a planet with seven billion people with a level of intelligence equivalent to that of East Asians. The global overpopulation crisis we face is almost entirely caused by religious fundamentalism. Religious fundamentalism in turn, is caused by people who lack intelligence. Intelligent people, capable of critical thinking, don't force children to carry out suicide bombings. A society with sufficient intelligent people, is one where dumb people adjust themselves to the culture of intelligent people, whereas in most societies the opposite occurs.
The solution we're looking for, is thus ultimately a form of cognitive enhancement. There are many different ways to go about this. It's possible for people to select the smartest embryo to implant, to ensure children have a genetic potential that far outweighs their parents.
There are however, far simpler probably more cost-effective methods we can already use right now. Millions of people, even in Western nations, suffer from iodine deficiency during pregnancy. This permanently stunts the IQ of their children. Similarly, we can feed people a healthy diet with sufficient Omega 3 fatty acids, encourage breastfeeding and eliminate gestational diabetes, while reducing exposure to fluoride which competitively displaces iodine in the human body.
If these solutions are genuinely pursued, we will raise the average IQ of the world's population, which should be sufficient to create the kind of conditions where people vote for leaders who take climate change seriously and pursue serious effort to preserve a habitable planet. We don't have to be like deer on an island, because we will have the cognitive potential to plan ahead for the crisis that looms ahead of us.
submitted by sourdoughsauerkraut to accountt1234 [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining is now wasting at least 60 times more electricity than is required, much of it is the least expensive hydro in the US and geothermal in the world. There are alternative crypto-coins that do not have this problem

The Wall Street Journal says that the Bitcoin hash rate is now 60 times more than it was last fall. The Bitcoin hash rate is directly proportionate to electric consumption. CoinDesk, the premier Bitcoin news site, explains that this is due to new specialize mining equipment made to cash in on the new Bitcoin mining bonanza
Wall Street Journal story
http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/04/29/bitbeat-for-bitcoin-miners-a-hot-problem-this-summe
Coin Desk story
http://www.coindesk.com/coindesk-mining-roundup-hot-issues-lawsuits-eco-mining/
Huge corporate Bitcoin mining operations are popping up in Central Washington State where the least expensive electric rates exist in the US, which are powered by hydro.
Link to Washington State Bitcoin mining article powered by hydro
http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/ap26/northwests-cheap-power-drawing-bitcoin-miners/
One huge operation already exists in Iceland, which has the least expensive electricity in the world. It is produced by hydro and geothermal means. Link to Iceland Bitcoin mining article
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/23/morning-agenda-the-bitcoin-mines-of-iceland/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
The alternative environmentally-friendly cryptocurrencies to Bitcoin are called Proof of Stake coins. Here is a Let’s Talk Bitcoin article on Proof of Stake coins:
http://letstalkbitcoin.com/experiments-in-cryptocurrency-sustainability/#.U2ZgoVea9J4
Two of the most promising Proof of Stake coins are Blackcoin and NXT. The links to their subreddits are below.
http://www.reddit.com/blackcoin
http://us.reddit.com/NXT/
submitted by RJSchex to RenewableEnergy [link] [comments]

How Could Bitcoin Suspect Leave an Iceland Prisons Comforts Behind? Easily (current BTC/USD price is $9741.42)

Latest Bitcoin News:
How Could Bitcoin Suspect Leave an Iceland Prisons Comforts Behind? Easily
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Blockchain | ICOs
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools. Follow us on Twitter @CoinSalad.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

More information on the Renewable Energy consumption of Bitcoin and the environmentally friendly alternative BlackCoin TL:DR

The amount of electricity required to maintain Bitcoin’s security is legendary. Its miners are scouring the globe searching for areas with the least-expensive electricity rates.
Unfortunately, these areas are where the least expensive renewable-energy resources exist in the world.
Links are provided below to the references to back up the claims made here. This document will be updated as needed based on your comments below.
It has been estimated that the additional electricity required to maintain BlackCoin’s cooperative minting network is much less than three one-thousands ( 3 / 1000 ) of what is now used to run an equivalent sized competitive Bitcoin mining network. Bitcoin’s current electrical consumption equipment arms race is gobbling up irreplaceable, renewable-energy resources in areas where they provide the less expensive renewable energy options bar none.
A recent study cited in the Wall Street Journal shows that the hash rate required for Bitcoin’s security last fall was one one-sixtieth (1 / 60) of what it is now. This hash rate inflation has been fueled by the tremendous profitability of large scale corporate mining operations, which have produced the mining technology arms race.
The largest known corporate Bitcoin mining operation is reported to be housed in a warehouse in Central Washington State where it takes advantage of the US’s lowest electricity rates bar none. The Spokane Review recently reported that a handful of additional competitors are now about to pop up.
Washington State is the leader in hydroelectric generation with 29% of the total national capacity according to the US Energy Information Administration. It is 10th in wind energy production. Nevertheless, the whole state still has the lowest residential electric rates in the country.
The New York Times reported on a similar setup in Iceland, which may have the least expensive electricity of any country in the world. It is powered by hydro and geothermal resources.
These corporate mining operations compete against each other for the right to enter the next ledger page into the Bitcoin blockchain. The startups that produce the otherwise useless mining equipment are forced to make outrageous claims for their latest drawing board designs to get preorder payments to finance their production as has been well documented by CoinDesk in numerous articles.
Are we about to repeat the environmental disasters that followed the 1849 California Gold Rush and the wildcatting boom that began with the Spindletop oil gusher? This trend will continue as long as the Bitcoin mining technology continues to improve at breakneck speed driven by the profitability resulting from the squandering of these irreplaceable resources.
It took three and a half years after Satoshi Nakamoto launched Bitcoin in January 2009 before Sunny King in August 2012 to launch Peercoin, the first environmentally friendly cryptocurrency. However, Peercoin is designed to be the savings account complementing the best environmentally friendly checking account cryptocurrency. The market has been trying since then to settle on the best environmentally friendly challenger for Bitcoin.
The Russian crypto developer rat4 launched BlackCoin on February 24, 2014 at 6:00 UTC after making the customary announcement on February 16 on the Bitcoin Forum. Startup crypto exchange Mintpal quickly recognized the potential of rat4’s improvement of the design of the innovative Mintcoin protocol.
This helped catapult BlackCoin into 19th place in market cap by the start of April. BlackCoin obtained its current 10 th place position after Coinkite chose Blackcoin to add to its terminals in June joining Bitcoin and Litecoin.
Sunny King’s protocol has now been tested on many environmentally friendly alternatives. The market has now chosen BlackCoin to be checking account to Peercoin’s saving account.
The Bitcoin MIT Project will provision every undergraduate at that institution with $100 worth of bitcoins in the fall semester as an experiment. The proposed BlackCoin MIT Airdrop is currently being discussed by the Blackcoin Community on its reddit page. The proposal calls for provisioning each MIT graduate student with $100 of the best environmentally friendly alternative to Bitcoin in the best technology crucible in the world.
It appears from the MIT announcement that the MIT Kerberos & Internet Trust Consortium may have been used as the vehicle for obtaining tax exempt fiat donations. Therefore, should the newly formed BlackCoin Foundation ask the Trust to set up a donation account and let the environmental community try to raise the less than $1 million required to fund the MIT Airdrop.
If you have arrived here from somewhere else and are interested in learning more about BlackCoin and the MIT BlackCoin Project, please join the discussion with us at the BlackCoin subreddit:
reddit.com/BlackCoin/
Please report proofreading and editing corrections in comments below. References
Electricity requirement calculations needed to maintain the BlackCoin network
http://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/25a4fq/if_you_are_good_at_science_or_if_you_are_an/
Wall Street Journal Article on Bitcoin hash rate
http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/04/29/bitbeat-for-bitcoin-miners-a-hot-problem-this-summe
Spokane Review Article
http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/ap26/northwests-cheap-power-drawing-bitcoin-miners/
US Energy Information Administration – Washington State Renewable Energy Report
http://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=WA
NT Times Iceland Bitcoin mining article
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/23/morning-agenda-the-bitcoin-mines-of-iceland/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=1
CoinDesk mining equipment articles
http://www.coindesk.com/coindesk-mining-roundup-hot-issues-lawsuits-eco-mining/
http://www.coindesk.com/problems-plague-kncminer-broken-super-jupiters-arrive-doorsteps/
http://www.coindesk.com/alpha-technology-initiates-scrypt-asic-tape/
Bitcoin MIT Project article that mentions MIT Kerberos & Internet Trust Consortium
http://tech.mit.edu/V134/N22/bitcoin.html
submitted by RJSchex to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Economics top posts from 2016-12-11 to 2017-12-10 14:09 PDT

Period: 363.96 days
Submissions Comments
Total 998 124701
Rate (per day) 2.74 341.28
Unique Redditors 447 16507
Combined Score 499738 904919

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 24425 points, 17 submissions: speckz
    1. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard (5125 points, 597 comments)
    2. America’s Lost Einsteins - Millions of children from poor families who excel in math and science rarely live up to their potential—and that hurts everyone. (3231 points, 440 comments)
    3. One in five American households have ‘zero or negative’ wealth (2951 points, 619 comments)
    4. Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong. The MIT economist Peter Temin argues that economic inequality results in two distinct classes. And only one of them has any power. (2717 points, 631 comments)
    5. After decades of pushing bachelor’s degrees, U.S. needs more tradespeople (2386 points, 587 comments)
    6. The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data (2200 points, 198 comments)
    7. Employees Who Stay In Companies Longer Than Two Years Get Paid 50% Less (1873 points, 260 comments)
    8. Student Loan Debt Is Now As Big as the U.S. Junk Market (1392 points, 380 comments)
    9. The tech sector is leaving the rest of the US economy in its dust (614 points, 235 comments)
    10. The Countries Most (and Least) Likely to be Affected by Automation. Japan is at the top with 55.7% while the US is at 45.8%. (532 points, 138 comments)
  2. 19191 points, 26 submissions: jimrosenz
    1. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds (7205 points, 402 comments)
    2. The Gender Pay Gap Is Largely Because of Motherhood (3325 points, 661 comments)
    3. 'Negligible' link between executive pay and firm's performance, says study (1561 points, 165 comments)
    4. We need to challenge the myth that the rich are specially-talented wealth creators (1231 points, 552 comments)
    5. Will MySpace ever lose its monopoly? (2007) (1219 points, 193 comments)
    6. Should the Government Bring Back Trust-Busting? (1093 points, 201 comments)
    7. Economics isn't a bogus science — we just don't use it correctly (625 points, 176 comments)
    8. ‘Exclusionary zoning’ is opportunity hoarding by upper middle class (559 points, 240 comments)
    9. Index Funds Are Great for Investors, Risky for Corporate Governance (358 points, 75 comments)
    10. Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest (324 points, 156 comments)
  3. 15893 points, 26 submissions: ghostofpennwast
    1. Student Debt Is a Major Reason Millennials Aren't Buying Homes (2228 points, 487 comments)
    2. Americans Are Paying $38 to Collect $1 of Student Debt (1598 points, 150 comments)
    3. Report: America’s marijuana industry headed for $24 billion by 2025 (1350 points, 74 comments)
    4. Solar Power Will Kill Coal Faster Than You Think (1336 points, 243 comments)
    5. Saudi Arabia signals end of tax-free living as oil revenues slump (1013 points, 264 comments)
    6. One-third of Americans say they’d have trouble coming up with an emergency $2,000 (979 points, 346 comments)
    7. Trump Seeks $3.6 Trillion in Spending Cuts to Reshape Government (977 points, 652 comments)
    8. Indian American community richest with median household income of $103,821 (846 points, 201 comments)
    9. Foreigners snap up record number of US homes (825 points, 363 comments)
    10. More Americans Are Falling Behind on Student Loans, and Nobody Quite Knows Why (679 points, 526 comments)
  4. 13354 points, 31 submissions: Splenda
    1. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence (5678 points, 501 comments)
    2. Handing Out Tax Breaks to Businesses Is Worse Than Useless: Study exposes the futility of the $45 billion that states spend on economic development incentives. (1410 points, 120 comments)
    3. The Never-Ending Foreclosure: How can the country survive the next economic crash if millions of families still haven't recovered from the last one? (1061 points, 331 comments)
    4. Memo To Steven Mnuchin: Trump's Tax Plan Would Add $7 Trillion To The Debt Over 10 Years (950 points, 317 comments)
    5. Rural America Is Aging and Shrinking (414 points, 364 comments)
    6. This Is What a Real Middle-Class Tax Cut Would Look Like (387 points, 252 comments)
    7. The coming battle between the Trump team and economists over the true cost of climate change (290 points, 102 comments)
    8. Here’s One Scary Way Trump’s Team Could Manipulate Government Data: It has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon, which has been called “the most important number you’ve never heard of.” (256 points, 29 comments)
    9. Hot and Violent: Researchers have begun to understand the economic and social damage caused by climate change. (238 points, 90 comments)
    10. How Wall Street Once Killed the U.S. Solar Industry… and how it could happen again. (238 points, 53 comments)
  5. 12703 points, 31 submissions: DoremusJessup
    1. U.S. Wage Disparity Took Another Turn for the Worse Last Year: The rich-poor pay gap is getting wider (1307 points, 323 comments)
    2. European Union finance ministers agreed on Tuesday to close loopholes multinational corporations use to skip taxation on dividends, part of a drive to stop them from parking profits where they pay the least tax (1063 points, 131 comments)
    3. Trump Plan to Slash LLC Rate Is Boon for Top Earners: Cutting pass-through rate to 15% could cost $2 trillion; Top 1% would get tax cut of $76,000 - Tax Policy Center (1046 points, 216 comments)
    4. Robots Are Slashing U.S. Wages and Worsening Pay Inequality: Robots have a real impact on jobs and wages, new research shows (1014 points, 391 comments)
    5. US Adds 156K Jobs; Unemployment Rate Ticks up to 4.7 Pct. Hourly pay jumped 2.9 percent from a year earlier, the biggest increase in more than seven years (883 points, 350 comments)
    6. Norway's sovereign wealth fund, the world's largest, on Friday called for a cap on executive pay and fiscal transparency at the companies in which it invests, further buffing its reputation as an ethical investor (846 points, 78 comments)
    7. U.S. payrolls increase more than expected, wages rise (842 points, 142 comments)
    8. America’s Biggest Creditors Dump Treasuries in Warning to Trump (838 points, 309 comments)
    9. Unemployment in the U.S. Is Falling, So Why Isn’t Pay Rising? (571 points, 228 comments)
    10. Citigroup on Thursday became the first-ever bank to get hit with civil "spoofing charges," after U.S. derivatives regulators said one of its units entered U.S. Treasury futures market orders with the intent of canceling them (511 points, 46 comments)
  6. 12274 points, 1 submission: CADBP
    1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA (12274 points, 809 comments)
  7. 11930 points, 4 submissions: trot-trot
    1. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say (11060 points, 1329 comments)
    2. Libor: Bank of England implicated in secret recording (517 points, 9 comments)
    3. 'These Boots are Made for Walking': Why Most Divorce Filers are Women (273 points, 268 comments)
    4. This Is Le Pen's Plan to Break Up the Euro (80 points, 11 comments)
  8. 11267 points, 16 submissions: unimployed
    1. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues (7086 points, 372 comments)
    2. The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes (1440 points, 319 comments)
    3. The Real Reason the U.S. Has Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance (566 points, 95 comments)
    4. US opioid crisis holds back jobs market recovery, says study (563 points, 74 comments)
    5. An important shift in the job market makes the mystery of weak wage growth less puzzling (345 points, 62 comments)
    6. The Economics and Politics Of Flooding and Insurance (266 points, 56 comments)
    7. Economic models are broken, and economists have wildly different ideas about how to fix them (198 points, 130 comments)
    8. Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck (128 points, 56 comments)
    9. Trump preparing withdrawal from South Korea trade deal (97 points, 46 comments)
    10. The Incredible Shrinking Corporate Tax Bill (93 points, 24 comments)
  9. 9635 points, 17 submissions: lingben
    1. I’m a Depression historian. The GOP tax bill is straight out of 1929 (2907 points, 577 comments)
    2. 35 of 37 economists said Trump was wrong. The other two misread the question. (2127 points, 198 comments)
    3. CEOs agree: Corporate tax cuts won't trickle down (738 points, 301 comments)
    4. Trump's Numbers Guy Isn't Great With Numbers (662 points, 111 comments)
    5. Trumponomics Gets The Thumbs Down From Nobel-Winning Economists (563 points, 268 comments)
    6. If Everyone Is So Confident, Why Aren’t They Borrowing? (466 points, 179 comments)
    7. Economists Have No Use for Republican Tax Cuts (447 points, 180 comments)
    8. Corruption Is Still a Problem Ten Months After India's Cash Ban (412 points, 39 comments)
    9. Should the rich be taxed more? (352 points, 554 comments)
    10. Trump Administration Considers Change in Calculating U.S. Trade Deficit (208 points, 19 comments)
  10. 9371 points, 1 submission: RegressToTheMean
    1. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan (9371 points, 848 comments)
  11. 8887 points, 39 submissions: mberre
    1. Japan logs longest phase of growth in 16 years (846 points, 76 comments)
    2. British Employers Begin To See A Pre-Brexit Exit Of Foreign Workers (746 points, 268 comments)
    3. US unemployment falls to 10-year low (602 points, 228 comments)
    4. U.S. new home sales fall to seven-month low (546 points, 242 comments)
    5. US deficit rises to 2008 levels (538 points, 91 comments)
    6. Iceland to end capital controls from 2008 financial crisis - BBC News (463 points, 48 comments)
    7. Swiss say goodbye to banking secrecy (450 points, 122 comments)
    8. Pew Research: In a Recovering Market, Homeownership Rates Are Down Sharply for Blacks, Young Adults (439 points, 183 comments)
    9. UK wealth gap 'widening over past decade' says report - BBC News (429 points, 182 comments)
    10. Fed's Williams calls for global rethink of monetary policy (387 points, 158 comments)
  12. 7956 points, 6 submissions: johnmountain
    1. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. (6708 points, 1020 comments)
    2. Paul Krugman in 1998: Internet’s Economic Impact No Greater Than Fax Machine (710 points, 261 comments)
    3. Without Power to Run A.T.M.s, Puerto Rico Is Cash Only (210 points, 15 comments)
    4. A basic income could boost the US economy by $2.5 trillion (150 points, 165 comments)
    5. America's housing inventory crisis is causing home prices to rise at double the rate of a 'normal' market (91 points, 15 comments)
    6. Why Do Cities Become Unaffordable? (87 points, 117 comments)
  13. 6952 points, 2 submissions: mjanes
    1. The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries. (5056 points, 575 comments)
    2. Reaganomics killed America’s middle class (1896 points, 468 comments)
  14. 6290 points, 2 submissions: Nolagamer
    1. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. (5268 points, 473 comments)
    2. Opioid crisis: Nearly half of working-age American men who are out of the labor force are using painkillers daily (1022 points, 137 comments)
  15. 5852 points, 7 submissions: PinkSlimeIsPeople
    1. Tax Cuts Don't Lead to Economic Growth, a New 65-Year Study Finds (3816 points, 352 comments)
    2. You're not imagining it: the rich really are hoarding economic growth (841 points, 546 comments)
    3. Vast Majority of Americans Would Likely Lose From Senate GOP’s $1.5 Trillion in Tax Cuts, Once They’re Paid For (347 points, 128 comments)
    4. Commentary: Signs Suggest Trump Budget Will Feature Unprecedented Cuts Plus Large Tax Cuts Favoring Wealthy (323 points, 212 comments)
    5. Eight Market-Oriented Proposals That Reduce Income Inequality (304 points, 280 comments)
    6. Republicans’ tax plan gives the top 1 percent of households a $207,000 tax cut; Bottom 20 percent get $50 (163 points, 154 comments)
    7. Eliminating Two ACA Medicare Taxes Means Huge Tax Cuts for High Earners and the Wealthy (58 points, 67 comments)
  16. 5489 points, 10 submissions: pipsdontsqueak
    1. Americans want U.S. goods, but not willing to pay more: Reuters/Ipsos poll (1219 points, 461 comments)
    2. After a Tax Crackdown, Apple Found a New Shelter for Its Profits (1216 points, 221 comments)
    3. Fed raises rates for third time since the recession (716 points, 170 comments)
    4. U.S. moves to impose tariffs of as much as 219 percent on Canadian jet maker, siding with Boeing (672 points, 120 comments)
    5. Bitcoin hits all-time high after CME Group says to launch futures (637 points, 365 comments)
    6. Trump Is Expected to Name Jerome Powell as Next Fed Chairman (451 points, 58 comments)
    7. Awaiting Trump's coal comeback, miners reject retraining (202 points, 118 comments)
    8. Republicans to propose keeping top tax rate for very wealthy, nodding to concerns (202 points, 63 comments)
    9. Experian fined $3M over 'inaccurate' credit scores (97 points, 3 comments)
    10. Paradise Papers: Apple's secret tax bolthole revealed (77 points, 8 comments)
  17. 5133 points, 2 submissions: MaxGhenis
    1. Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists (4128 points, 575 comments)
    2. San Francisco Bans Salary History Questions (1005 points, 243 comments)
  18. 4744 points, 16 submissions: InvisibleTextArea
    1. New Zealand bans foreign home buyers (1744 points, 533 comments)
    2. EU Audit Admits Greek Bailouts Didn't Go as Planned (811 points, 291 comments)
    3. Renters in the UK spend average of 62 per cent of income on rent (627 points, 104 comments)
    4. Venezuela pulls most common banknote from circulation to 'beat mafia' (369 points, 80 comments)
    5. Yet again, today’s politicians are ignoring basic economics (166 points, 111 comments)
    6. The next crash risk is hiding in plain sight (159 points, 36 comments)
    7. After Universal Basic Income, The Flood (143 points, 118 comments)
    8. Slow economic growth is not the new normal, it's the old norm (124 points, 117 comments)
    9. Cryptoeconomics 101 (88 points, 9 comments)
    10. Of productivity in France and in Germany (85 points, 19 comments)
  19. 4258 points, 16 submissions: kludgeocracy
    1. How Corporations and the Wealthy Avoid Taxes (and How to Stop Them) (787 points, 296 comments)
    2. How “Shareholder Value” is Killing Innovation (637 points, 217 comments)
    3. Capitalism Can Thrive Without Cooking the Planet (547 points, 296 comments)
    4. American builders’ productivity has plunged by half since the late 1960s (519 points, 112 comments)
    5. There's a $136,400 reason so many Americans feel they haven't made economic progress (470 points, 186 comments)
    6. What Happened When 18 States Raised Their Minimum Wage? (242 points, 189 comments)
    7. Democrats just united on a $15-an-hour minimum wage (208 points, 252 comments)
    8. Avoiding Payday Loans Makes the Poor Richer (201 points, 44 comments)
    9. Maybe We’ve Been Thinking About the Productivity Slump All Wrong (167 points, 92 comments)
    10. Researchers have answered a big question about the decline of the middle class (95 points, 50 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. tcoop6231 (6607 points, 678 comments)
  2. SmokingPuffin (5048 points, 544 comments)
  3. MasterBerter (4931 points, 369 comments)
  4. louieanderson (4560 points, 710 comments)
  5. autotldr (3551 points, 333 comments)
  6. TitaniumDragon (3202 points, 693 comments)
  7. Adam_df (3193 points, 611 comments)
  8. HTownian25 (3165 points, 392 comments)
  9. slash196 (3002 points, 284 comments)
  10. thewimsey (2932 points, 534 comments)
  11. MELBOT87 (2835 points, 187 comments)
  12. HeFlipYa (2819 points, 380 comments)
  13. Ponderay (2809 points, 198 comments)
  14. Mylon (2732 points, 510 comments)
  15. ucstruct (2729 points, 241 comments)
  16. bartink (2473 points, 645 comments)
  17. throwittomebro (2360 points, 490 comments)
  18. holy_rollers (2318 points, 211 comments)
  19. Lando_Calrissian (2314 points, 14 comments)
  20. bokabo (2250 points, 487 comments)
  21. skatastic57 (2212 points, 284 comments)
  22. bobmarles3 (2179 points, 189 comments)
  23. Splenda (2159 points, 366 comments)
  24. mwatwe01 (2133 points, 34 comments)
  25. UpsideVII (2120 points, 171 comments)
  26. sunflowerfly (2032 points, 178 comments)
  27. OliverSparrow (2002 points, 362 comments)
  28. Rookwood (1965 points, 297 comments)
  29. besttrousers (1948 points, 181 comments)
  30. sethstorm (1928 points, 880 comments)
  31. roboczar (1899 points, 133 comments)
  32. HumanKapital_ (1889 points, 404 comments)
  33. itsreaditpeople (1887 points, 13 comments)
  34. cd411 (1880 points, 62 comments)
  35. brberg (1841 points, 287 comments)
  36. Brad_Wesley (1811 points, 183 comments)
  37. DrSandbags (1772 points, 164 comments)
  38. DefendedCobra29 (1727 points, 27 comments)
  39. Uptons_BJs (1660 points, 70 comments)
  40. TracyMorganFreeman (1655 points, 628 comments)
  41. whyrat (1652 points, 110 comments)
  42. FweeSpeech (1648 points, 68 comments)
  43. darwin2500 (1635 points, 229 comments)
  44. Holophonist (1612 points, 247 comments)
  45. Nolagamer (1569 points, 272 comments)
  46. Dave1mo1 (1553 points, 171 comments)
  47. WordSalad11 (1546 points, 167 comments)
  48. HeTalksToComputers (1511 points, 141 comments)
  49. number676766 (1475 points, 7 comments)
  50. matty_a (1445 points, 1 comment)

Top Submissions

  1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA by CADBP (12274 points, 809 comments)
  2. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say by trot-trot (11060 points, 1329 comments)
  3. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan by RegressToTheMean (9371 points, 848 comments)
  4. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds by jimrosenz (7205 points, 402 comments)
  5. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues by unimployed (7086 points, 372 comments)
  6. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. by johnmountain (6708 points, 1020 comments)
  7. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence by Splenda (5678 points, 501 comments)
  8. Warren Buffett declared victory Saturday in his decade-long, $1 million bet that low-cost index funds would out earn more expensive hedge funds by deleted (5318 points, 311 comments)
  9. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. by Nolagamer (5268 points, 473 comments)
  10. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard by speckz (5125 points, 597 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 1760 points: itsreaditpeople's comment in Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA
  2. 1678 points: mwatwe01's comment in Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say
  3. 1445 points: matty_a's comment in Trump Administration Rolls Back Protections for People in Default on Student Loans
  4. 1411 points: electrik_wizard's comment in The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries.
  5. 1326 points: number676766's comment in Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists
  6. 1314 points: Lando_Calrissian's comment in Trump names Japan a currency manipulator
  7. 1201 points: DefendedCobra29's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  8. 1004 points: kristopolous's comment in Reaganomics killed America’s middle class
  9. 1000 points: TheWhitestOrca's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  10. 983 points: BmoreIntelligent's comment in The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoCurrency top posts from 2016-03-26 to 2017-03-25 06:16 PDT

Period: 363.66 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 5933
Rate (per day) 2.75 16.28
Unique Redditors 374 1711
Combined Score 21623 13093

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1930 points, 78 submissions: Coinosphere
    1. Bitcoin expected to become part of everyday life in the Caribbean within eighteen months as banks abandon the region (70 points, 11 comments)
    2. Marijuana now legal in eight more US States while vendors get more bitcoin options (66 points, 0 comments)
    3. Bitfinex hacked, halts trading, deposits, and withdrawals - 119,756 BTC lost so far with no insurance (60 points, 5 comments)
    4. Hacker holds San Francisco railway to ransom, demands 100 bitcoins (59 points, 8 comments)
    5. South Korea plans national digital currency using a Blockchain (52 points, 6 comments)
    6. Santander says ‘Yes to bitcoin’ in Brazil (50 points, 3 comments)
    7. Ukraine to be the first government to integrate blockchain technology, targets corruption (48 points, 1 comment)
    8. 50% of all consumers would use bank alternatives, including bitcoin, as Bank irrelevance grows (46 points, 0 comments)
    9. Core Bitcoin developer uncovers possible plot by ChainAnchor to force AML onto Bitcoin (46 points, 9 comments)
    10. Seafile replaces Paypal with bitcoin after Paypal privacy shenanigans (46 points, 0 comments)
  2. 930 points, 39 submissions: helmsk
    1. Countdown: Bitcoin Will Be a Legal Method of Payment in Japan in Two Months (88 points, 2 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Transactions Declared VAT-Exempt in Norway (85 points, 3 comments)
    3. Zeronet Wants to Replace the Dark Web by Marrying Bitcoin to Bittorrent Over Tor (46 points, 3 comments)
    4. Central Bank of Nigeria Says ‘We Can’t Stop Bitcoin’ (44 points, 6 comments)
    5. New Image Hosting Service Pays Thousands of Uploaders in Bitcoin (43 points, 4 comments)
    6. Coinbase Exits as Hawaii Requires Bitcoin Companies to Hold Fiat Reserves (39 points, 7 comments)
    7. Europe Lays Out Roadmap to Restrict Payments in Cash and Cryptocurrencies (35 points, 1 comment)
    8. One of These 5 Hyperinflating Economies Could Adopt Bitcoin in 2017 (32 points, 6 comments)
    9. Polish Bitcoin Adoption Escalating with Strong Ecosystem (30 points, 1 comment)
    10. A Look At Bitcoin Bubbles, When Will the Next One Be? (25 points, 6 comments)
  3. 846 points, 36 submissions: e-ok
    1. Europe Will Have Power to Ban Blockchain Tech in January 2018 (51 points, 20 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Projects on Github Surpass 10,000 (47 points, 3 comments)
    3. Italy's Largest Taxi Fleet Accepts Bitcoin (46 points, 2 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Symbol Left Out of Unicode's Latest Version (42 points, 4 comments)
    5. Malta's Prime Minister Says Europe Should Become the Bitcoin Continent (40 points, 3 comments)
    6. SEC Rejects Rule Change for Bitcoin ETF (32 points, 0 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Price Poised for a Breakout, Technical Analysis Shows (31 points, 5 comments)
    8. ECB to EU: Tighter Regulations, Less Anonymity on Digital Currencies (29 points, 8 comments)
    9. OpenBazaar 2.0 Now Running on Tor Network (27 points, 0 comments)
    10. Trump's Trade War With China Could Boost Chinese Bitcoin Demand (27 points, 8 comments)
  4. 801 points, 39 submissions: Posternut
    1. ‘Decentralized Reddit’ Steemit Awards $1.3 Million to Users (48 points, 15 comments)
    2. IBM Invests $200M Into Blockchain and IoT Research at German Headquarters (45 points, 2 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Price Rally Rages on, Market Cap Passes $10Bn USD (34 points, 0 comments)
    4. Apple Tells Jaxx To Remove Dashpay (31 points, 32 comments)
    5. Secret Chinese Bitcoin Mines Are Mining Millions (31 points, 4 comments)
    6. A Decentralized World Has No Kings (29 points, 0 comments)
    7. China's Social Security Fund to Use Blockchain Technology (28 points, 3 comments)
    8. FBI Director: 'There's No Such Thing As Absolute Privacy’ (28 points, 4 comments)
    9. Kim Dotcom’s Mega & Bitcoin ‘Baby’ Will Be Born This January (28 points, 5 comments)
    10. BitPay Launches Loadable Visa (27 points, 0 comments)
  5. 784 points, 35 submissions: CryptoCurrencyNews
    1. Libertarian City Liberstad in Norway is Moving Forward Using Bitcoin as Primary Currency (67 points, 8 comments)
    2. What Is the Flippening? (53 points, 16 comments)
    3. Only 807 People Have Declared Bitcoin for Tax Purposes According to IRS (40 points, 12 comments)
    4. Storj to Migrate Decentralized Storage Service to Ethereum Blockchain (40 points, 5 comments)
    5. Darknet Marketplace AlphaBay Will Enable Ethereum Payments Soon (35 points, 14 comments)
    6. The Trump Administration is Buying Into Blockchain Tech (35 points, 5 comments)
    7. Coinbase Receives Approval To Trade Ether and Litecoin in New York (32 points, 2 comments)
    8. Bitcoin's Price Just Finished its First Month Above $1,000 (29 points, 1 comment)
    9. Chinese Central Bank Requiring Extreme Customer Verifications at Exchanges (29 points, 5 comments)
    10. The EU is Now Targeting “Unpermissioned” Blockchains (29 points, 10 comments)
  6. 633 points, 35 submissions: twigwam
    1. Creator of the JavaScript language and early Internet pioneer plans blockchain-based digital ad platform on the Ethereum network (40 points, 18 comments)
    2. NYTimes on Ethereum... (37 points, 15 comments)
    3. The Disaster that is Bitcoin (35 points, 20 comments)
    4. Bitcoin is a Highly Centralized Network, Says Harvard Researcher - CCN (31 points, 14 comments)
    5. Gavin: Ethereum will outgrow Bitcoin at this pace. (28 points, 9 comments)
    6. The Amount of Self-Proclaimed Ethereum Experts Surpasses 3,000 On LinkedIn (25 points, 8 comments)
    7. [The Economist] Ethereum: One blockchain to rule them all? - talk with Vitalik Buterin (25 points, 0 comments)
    8. How the blockchain will radically transform the economy | Bettina Warburg (22 points, 9 comments)
    9. Vitalik Buterin to Debut Ethereum Scaling Paper at Devcon - CoinDesk (22 points, 7 comments)
    10. [Coinbase] "is convinced that public blockchains and cryptocurrencies would eventually produce greater innovation, just as the open Internet has changed society more than private intranets have." - Forbes in-depth article (20 points, 0 comments)
  7. 522 points, 20 submissions: olivercarding
    1. Bitcoin Activity in India Has Doubled Since the Banknote Ban (58 points, 0 comments)
    2. Apple Approves Steem, Lisk and Digicash for App Store; Rejects Ethereum Classic (57 points, 10 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Has Many Fans at Amazon According to Purse CEO Andrew Lee (50 points, 5 comments)
    4. $5 Worth of Bitcoin Gets You Internet ‘For Life’ on the Darknet (36 points, 7 comments)
    5. 4 Monero Features That Enable Better Privacy Than Bitcoin (35 points, 0 comments)
    6. Bitcoin is Eating the Entire Online Gambling Industry (31 points, 2 comments)
    7. Report Estimates There are More Than 10 Million Bitcoin Holders Worldwide (28 points, 7 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Dominance Index Approaches 90% as Ethereum and Steem Decline (25 points, 4 comments)
    9. Singapore’s Status Wants to Bring Ethereum to Every Mobile Device (25 points, 0 comments)
    10. Slock.It Says 'The DAO's Journey is Over' (23 points, 0 comments)
  8. 513 points, 21 submissions: _CapR_
    1. Polls suggest the Pirate Party who support Bitcoins as legal tender may win Saturday's election in Iceland (48 points, 3 comments)
    2. ALERT: Apple just approved two more scam wallets, please help reporting them - (/Bitcoin x-post) (41 points, 0 comments)
    3. War On Cash Intensifies: Citibank To Stop Accepting Cash At Some Branches (40 points, 3 comments)
    4. Russian Authorities: Bitcoin Poses No Threat, Won’t Be Banned (36 points, 5 comments)
    5. The Govt. Realized Bitcoin Could Not Be Shut down, Says U.S. Federal Prosecutor - CryptoCoinsNews (36 points, 7 comments)
    6. Saudis, China dump treasuries; foreign banks liquidate a record $346 billion in US paper (33 points, 2 comments)
    7. IRS Fail: Treasury Audit Says it Can't Manage Virtual Currencies - Bitcoin News (32 points, 2 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Is Real Money, Judge Rules in J.P. Morgan Hack (31 points, 0 comments)
    9. Massive scams like OneCoin harm all of crypto & can increase bad regs - help me make a letter on GitHub to send to enforcement agencies (29 points, 9 comments)
    10. Deploy is the fastest and easiest way to create an OpenBazaar store that will stay up 24/7, auto-update, and operate securely. (27 points, 0 comments)
  9. 365 points, 20 submissions: jholmes91
    1. Monero Testing $10, Releases Official Wallet (39 points, 1 comment)
    2. Litecoin Creator: I think there's a General Confusion that SegWit Signaling is a Vote (28 points, 2 comments)
    3. Open-source Cold Storage Guide for Bitcoin in the Works! (27 points, 1 comment)
    4. One in Five Users May Abandon Bitcoin Because of Privacy Concerns (24 points, 19 comments)
    5. Jaxx Wallet Set to Integrate DASH This Week (23 points, 4 comments)
    6. IRS Summons Coinbase, but the Bitcoin Exchange Fights Back (22 points, 2 comments)
    7. New OpenBazaar Release Provides Altcoin Integration (21 points, 12 comments)
    8. Russia's Ministry of Finance Wants to Legalize Bitcoin (21 points, 0 comments)
    9. Monero Appreciation Intensifies on Darknet Adoption (20 points, 7 comments)
    10. Monero Attracts Mainstream Media After ZCash Decline & Controversial Launch (18 points, 0 comments)
  10. 355 points, 17 submissions: coin_news
    1. Major Korean Bank to launch bitcoin-backed remittance service (40 points, 1 comment)
    2. Experts say Scotland should adopt blockchain technology, or risk losing tens of thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions in earnings (32 points, 1 comment)
    3. Tumblers and unregulated wallet providers are the target of global cybercrime conference (30 points, 8 comments)
    4. Gemini launches daily bitcoin auctions to provide better price discovery (27 points, 0 comments)
    5. U.S. Department of Homeland Security funds four blockchain companies developing new cyber security technology (27 points, 1 comment)
    6. Deloitte boosts blockchain adoption by installing a bitcoin ATM in their Toronto office (25 points, 0 comments)
    7. DC attorneys suggest Federal Reserve actively embrace and utilize blockchain technology (24 points, 2 comments)
    8. House of Lords told Bank of England's digital currency is 'some way off' (24 points, 1 comment)
    9. 75% of corporate treasurers in Africa and Latin America interested in blockchain solutions (21 points, 0 comments)
    10. Public blockchains gaining acceptance at Bank of Japan’s Payment and Settlement Forum (17 points, 0 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. nugymmer (404 points, 207 comments)
  2. trancephorm (289 points, 67 comments)
  3. SeemedGood (132 points, 53 comments)
  4. indiamikezulu (91 points, 55 comments)
  5. kingofthejaffacakes (88 points, 22 comments)
  6. jwinterm (87 points, 32 comments)
  7. antiprosynthesis (83 points, 43 comments)
  8. nagalim (80 points, 28 comments)
  9. phor2zero (77 points, 13 comments)
  10. humbrie (76 points, 33 comments)
  11. RawlzSec (75 points, 17 comments)
  12. thegauntlet (73 points, 23 comments)
  13. MasterMined710 (70 points, 44 comments)
  14. wolffang1 (68 points, 39 comments)
  15. marenkar (62 points, 24 comments)
  16. shbour (58 points, 26 comments)
  17. twigwam (57 points, 33 comments)
  18. sn0wr4in (56 points, 14 comments)
  19. strips_of_serengeti (56 points, 14 comments)
  20. travis- (55 points, 16 comments)
  21. ASG3 (54 points, 36 comments)
  22. isrly_eder (54 points, 12 comments)
  23. Explodicle (53 points, 29 comments)
  24. _CapR_ (53 points, 25 comments)
  25. autotldr (52 points, 28 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Employee mined bitcoins on Federal Reserve servers for two years by _bnc (106 points, 15 comments)
  2. Talking to people about CryptoCurrencies be like... by discombobulatedone (91 points, 11 comments)
  3. Bitcoin falls below 70% of total cryptocurrency market cap for the first time by SatoshiRoshi (90 points, 62 comments)
  4. Countdown: Bitcoin Will Be a Legal Method of Payment in Japan in Two Months by helmsk (88 points, 2 comments)
  5. Monero successfully hardforks! by jml390 (85 points, 33 comments)
  6. Bitcoin Transactions Declared VAT-Exempt in Norway by helmsk (85 points, 3 comments)
  7. Kraken launches Monero trading by jml390 (82 points, 3 comments)
  8. Poloniex is Secure. We're Good. by Poloniex (79 points, 52 comments)
  9. EU Parliament states Virtual Currencies cannot be anonymous by -bnc (70 points, 26 comments)
  10. Bitcoin expected to become part of everyday life in the Caribbean within eighteen months as banks abandon the region by Coinosphere (70 points, 11 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 44 points: boppie's comment in EU Parliament states Virtual Currencies cannot be anonymous
  2. 40 points: ihaphleas's comment in Bitcoin is not private, only decentralised. What is the most private, secure, and decentralised crypto currency?
  3. 32 points: FatherSigma's comment in How many people here know about Monero (XMR)?
  4. 32 points: adidasimwearing's comment in Best Alternative to Bitcoin
  5. 31 points: TH3J4CK4L's comment in Which coins are currently superior to Bitcoin as a currency / store of money?
  6. 26 points: eleitl's comment in Europe Will Have Power to Ban Blockchain Tech in January 2018
  7. 26 points: trancephorm's comment in Zcash trusted setup disaster. The number of parties used should have much larger. It is sad that they never properly responded to this concern.
  8. 25 points: phor2zero's comment in Which coins are currently superior to Bitcoin as a currency / store of money?
  9. 24 points: pasttense's comment in EU Parliament states Virtual Currencies cannot be anonymous
  10. 24 points: trancephorm's comment in Roger Ver Selling his Bitcoin for Dash to Protest Core Censorship (Today's Tony Podcast)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Someone please proofread what I have written below, so it can be posted on r/environment and other such subreddits.

Here is the title.
Bitcoin requires a tremendous amount of electricity to be maintain, but there are much more environmentally-friendly, alternative cryptocurrencies. Please demand that merchants accept the environmentally friendly alternatives.
Executive Summary:
Large Bitcoin mining operations are now being constructed in places where they unnecessarily squander the least expensive, renewable hydro-electric and geothermal-electric resources. There are very environmentally-friendly, readily-available, alternative cryptocurrencies such as Blackcoin and NXT that do not pose a threat to these precious renewable resources.
The environmentally unfriendly coins that require a lot of electricity to mine are called Proof of Work (PoW) coins. The environmentally friendly alternatives like Blackcoin and NXT are called Proof of Stake (PoS) coins.
The price spike in bitcoin last fall has led to an arms race to adopt electricity-gobbling, specialized mining equipment in the pursuit of corporate mining profits. They were not required to maintain Bitcoin prior to their invention. Specialized mining equipment for a second class of coins, which are similar to Litecoin, another PoW coin, is about to start shipping. This will lead to another large surge in unnecessary corporate mining operations and greatly increase the electrical demand in the race for corporate mining profits.
You can read the long report below.to find out more about the issue, and you can visit blackcoin and NXT at the links below to find out more about our coins. If you have heard enough and just want to do something quick and simple to support our efforts, visit blackcoin and NXT, click on our subscriber button to show your support, and then watch us take on Bitcoin. While you visit the two subreddits, you can judge for yourself which one you think will succeed.
Hopefully, some respected environmentalist will start campaigns to get merchants that already accept Bitcoin and Litecoin to start accepting the environmentally friendly alternatives.
http://www.reddit.com/blackcoin
http://us.reddit.com/NXT/
Electrical requirement to mine PoW coins:
The Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Dogecoin ledger are maintained by miners who compete against each other to see who can first find the next page for their blockchains. Only the miner that wins the race for each ledger page gets paid in coins.
As a result of this competition and the late 2013 price spike, Bitcoin mining corporate startups are popping up in central Washington State as documented in the first link below to take advantage of the inexpensive, renewable hydro-electricity and in Iceland as documented in the second link below to take advantage of the renewable hydro and geothermal resources. If bitcoin continue to expand, it will unnecessarily eat up more and more of these valuable renewable resources
Link to Washington State Bitcoin mining article
http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/ap26/northwests-cheap-power-drawing-bitcoin-miners/
Link to Iceland Bitcoin mining article
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/23/morning-agenda-the-bitcoin-mines-of-iceland/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
The next surge in electricity requirement is about to happen:
The mining hardware manufacturers are about to start shipping specialized mining equipment that can only mine the Litecoin and Dogecoin type of PoW coins as documented in the two links below. This new front in the mining arms race will gobble up much more precious renewable electricity in the competitive pursuit of corporate mining profits than is currently required to update the ledgers of these coins.
http://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/news/innosilicon-a2-terminator-scrypt-asics-first-28nm-chips-litecoin-dogecoin-mining/2014/04/30
https://coinreport.net/zeusminer-pre-orders-scrypt-asic-miners/
http://www.coindesk.com/mining-roundup-multipools-doge-amazon-ec2-11ghs-usb-sticks/
This specialized equipment is prostituting the original bitcoin promise
The tremendously profitable mining of crypto coins that are competitively produced is unnecessarily prostituting the original concept of their inventor, Satoshi Nakamoto. He envisioned bitcoins as being mined on standard personal computers while preforming other useful tasks. Instead, special computer hardware is being manufactured costing upwards to $10,000 apiece which can perform only one task. These individual units are being racked up in warehouses now.
This specialized equipment was not required for Bitcoin prior to its invention and is not required currently for Litecoin and Dogecoin. However, it is coming anyway producing an unnecessary arm race in the pursuit of corporate profits.
These specialized dev ices are energy inefficient in a second ways.
These specialized devices generate so much heat that they require elaborate energy-intensive cooling system for large operation. One of the most elaborate of these cooling systems is documented in the link below for a Hong Cong corporate mining operation that emerges the energy-wasting equipment in boiling goo to keep it cool. Thus, not only does it take electricity to run the equipment for these large operations, but more to keep it all cool.
http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/2/5165428/bitcoin-mine-in-hong-kong-uses-jelly-to-keep-cool
PoS coins are the environmentally friendly alternative.
In contrast, the ledger pages of coins like Blackcoin and NXT are generated by stakeholders who cooperate to perform the task which are being done on standard multitasking computers. Many of these computers would be running anyway as originally envisioned by the inventor of the blockchain.
If you have heard enough and just want to do something quick and simple to support our efforts, visit blackcoin and NXT, click on our subscriber button to show your support, and then watch us take on Bitcoin. While you visit the two subreddits, you can judge for yourself which one you think will succeed.
Hopefully, some respected environmentalist will start campaigns to get merchants that already accept Bitcoin and Litecoin to start accepting the environmentally friendly alternatives.
http://www.reddit.com/blackcoin
http://us.reddit.com/NXT/
submitted by RJSchex to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Would the MIT community be interested in a head to head competition between Bitcoin and one of the top environmental friendly alternatives next fall? Bitcoin mining wastes at least 60 times more electricity than all of the most energy efficient alternative coins.

The Wall Street Journal says that the Bitcoin hash rate is now 60 times more than it was last fall. The Bitcoin hash rate is directly proportionate to electric consumption. CoinDesk, the premier Bitcoin news site, explains that this is due to new specialize mining equipment made to cash in on the new Bitcoin mining bonanza
Link to Wall Street Journal article
http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/04/29/bitbeat-for-bitcoin-miners-a-hot-problem-this-summe
Link to CoinDesk article:
http://www.coindesk.com/coindesk-mining-roundup-hot-issues-lawsuits-eco-mining/
Huge corporate Bitcoin mining operations are popping up in Central Washington State where the least expensive electric rates exist in the US, which are powered by hydro.
Link to Washington State Bitcoin mining article powered by hydro
http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/ap26/northwests-cheap-power-drawing-bitcoin-miners/
One huge operation already exists in Iceland, which has the least expensive electricity in the world. It is produced by hydro and geothermal means. Link to Iceland Bitcoin mining article
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/23/morning-agenda-the-bitcoin-mines-of-iceland/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
The alternative environmentally-friendly cryptocurrencies to Bitcoin are called Proof of Stake coins. Here is a Let’s Talk Bitcoin article on Proof of Stake coins:
http://letstalkbitcoin.com/experiments-in-cryptocurrency-sustainability/#.U2ZgoVea9J4
Two of the most promising Proof of Stake coins are Blackcoin and NXT. The links to their subreddits are below.
http://www.reddit.com/blackcoin
http://us.reddit.com/NXT/
The Blackcoin community is trying to develop a MIT Blackcoin Project. It has been suggested that each graduate students be provided $100 worth of Blackcoins. Besides being more environmentally friendly, Blackcoin is six times faster than Bitcoin.
The object of the competition would be to see if one coin became dominate over time. Bitcoin will have the initial infrastructure advantage. Will the Bitcoin, Litecoin, and, Dogecoin supporting companies be willing to offer a Blackcoin option? Coinkite will be adding Blackcoin to its Bitcoin/Litecoin lineup in June.
submitted by RJSchex to mit [link] [comments]

Who could be behind Auroracoin? Could it be bitcoin miners in Iceland?

If you ask yourself what type of person is most likely to be behind Auroracoin, one would have to answer: someone who knows a lot about Iceland as well as Bitcoin?
This New York Times article: http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/23/morning-agenda-the-bitcoin-mines-of-iceland/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0 provides a suspect.
Bitcoin mining requires a lot of electricity to run the hardware as well as to cool it. Iceland has cheap hydro and geothermal electricity as well as free, relatively cool air for the taking. This allows the bitcoin miner in this story to claim that he is virtually printing money.
Even if this company was not initially involved in this project, do you really believe they would not have gotten involved by now? They have the equipment to mine and the funds to also support the currency. Think about it.
submitted by RJSchex to auroracoin [link] [comments]

The Bitcoin Group #30 (Live) - FCC Kills Net Neutrality -- Bitcoin Ebay Paypal -- China -- Venture C Winklevoss twins to open Bitcoin ETF -- BTC London ... World Highest Currency (2019) - 180+ Countries compared ... New York Times Report: SECRET ‘Facebook Coin’ Set To ... Is Bitcoin Evil?

INTO THE BITCOIN MINES On the flat lava plain of Reykjanesbaer, Iceland, near the Arctic Circle, you can find the Bitcoin mines, Nathaniel Popper reports in DealBook.There, more than 100 whirring silver computers, each in a locked cabinet and each cooled by blasts of Arctic air, are the laborers of the virtual mines where Bitcoins are unearthed. Held for questioning in a $2 million theft of Bitcoin-mining computers, Sindri Stefansson soon escaped a facility with individual rooms that have flat-screen TVs. An international manhunt ensued. Bitcoin energy use in Iceland set to overtake homes, says local firm. By Chris Baraniuk Technology reporter. Published. 12 February 2018 . image copyright AFP. image caption Nearly 100% of energy ... Inside Iceland’s Bitcoin bunkers At a secure facility that was once a NATO base, computer servers run around the clock mining bitcoins. Mar 2, 2020, 11:06 am* At a secure facility that was once a NATO base, computer servers run around the clock mining bitcoins. The company behind the operation relies on cheap energy to turn processing power into cash.

[index] [15061] [22661] [20864] [30790] [47291] [6959] [9603] [51059] [24784] [11046]

The Bitcoin Group #30 (Live) - FCC Kills Net Neutrality -- Bitcoin Ebay Paypal -- China -- Venture C

This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Is Bitcoin evil? If so, why? In an old column New York Times columnist Paul Krugman attempts to make a case against Bitcoin. I attempt to take apart his logic and explain why Bitcoin may in fact ... Facebook’s Secret Coin Proof Whales Accumulating Bitcoin Lighting Torch Sent To LinkedIn Founder Steve Wozniak Likes Bitcoin Ripple’s XRP on Coinbase... The video compares nearly every currently circulating currency in the world. More than 180 Currencies and Countries are included. Additionally, we have added... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue

#